The Force Awakens and Batman V Superman Trailers

Both of these films will be monster hits and both of them will have their haters. For me, I am just as excited for each one. Star Wars looks to be capturing the entire saga’s weight and carrying it forward, BvS looks to challenge us with all the right questions and differentiate itself from what came before, boldly going where no superhero movie has gone before. It is a great time to be a geek! Look for upcoming discussions of both trailers in The 602 Club, coming soon.

Star Wars: Episode VII: The Force Awakens

Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice 

 

The 602 Club S2: He’s George Freaking Lucas

tsc-0S2-th-squareThe Star Wars Saga.

Some nights after closing time Ruby serves up something special and in this supplemental episode of The 602 Club host Matthew Rushing and John Mills enjoy a rare vintage and talk Star Wars. We discuss everything, the Prequels, The Clone Wars, the Jedi, unexplored time periods, the expanded universe then and now, the Holiday Special, Special Editions, the new films, comics and the digital releases. It’s a conversation of love and laughs about the entire saga of Star Wars.

The 602 Club 25: Paradise Lost for Pirates

tsc-025-th-squarePirates of the Caribbean.

In 2002 Disney decided to make a film based on one of it’s theme park rides. The Country Bears was a box office flop, yet this did not deter the studio from continuing to mining it’s rides for inspiration. The very next year, Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl would become a monster hit, going on to inspire 3 more films with a 5th one currently in the works.

In this episode of The 602 Club host Matthew Rushing is joined by the ladies of Educating Geeks, Alice Baker and Megan Calcote to talk about the original Pirates of the Caribbean movie. We discuss the shock of learning Disney was making a movie based on another theme park ride, the casting, the way the movie winks to the audience, the surprising depth of the story, the music, production value and why this should have been just one film.

The 602 Club 24: The Dr. No of the Marvel Franchise

tsc-024-th-squareIron Man.

Some movies spend years languishing in development hell and Iron Man was one of the longest. From 1990 to 2005 it bounced around from studio to studio; it wasn’t until 2006 that Marvel acquired back the rights and decided to use it as the launching pad for it’s own studio as well as a cinematic universe that the film would finally materialize.

In this episode of The 602 Club host Matthew Rushing is joined by Jose Munoz, Andi VanderKolk and Daniel Proulx to talk about Iron Man. We discuss the long production history of the film, our first thoughts, realism in comic book movies, The cast, the villain, story, music, direction and ask if it still holds up. 

The Passion of Doctrine

I have been slowly reading though Dorothy Sayers work, Letters to a Diminished Church. Her very first chapter is about the drama of the incarnation of Christ and what sets it apart in human history. It felt like the right time to share it, just a few days before Easter, to meditate on what it is that we celebrate and just how incredible it is. I love the way she brings to life the doctrine to life.

nativity“The Church’s answer is categorical and uncompromising, and it is this: that Jesus Bar-Joseph, the carpenter of Nazareth, was in fact and in truth, and in the most exact and literal sense of the words, the God “by whom all things were made.” His body and brain were those of a common man; his personality was the personality of God, so far as that personality could be expressed in human terms. He was not a kind of demon pretending to be human; he was in every respect a genuine living man. He was not merely a man so good as to be “like God”— he was God.

“Now, this is not just a pious commonplace; it is not a commonplace at all. For what it means is this, among other things: that for whatever reason God chose to make man as he is—limited and suffering and subject to sorrows and death—he [God] had the honesty and the courage to take his own medicine. Whatever game he is playing with his creation, he has kept his own rules and played fair. He can exact nothing from man that he has not exacted from himself. He has himself gone through the whole of human experience, from the trivial irritations of family life and the cramping restrictions of hard work and lack of money to the worst horrors of pain and humiliation, defeat, despair, and death. When he was a man, he played the man. He was born in poverty and died in disgrace and though it well worthwhile.”

“Christianity is, of course, not the only religion that has found the best explanation of human life in the idea of an incarnate and suffering god. The Egyptian Osiris died and rose again; Aeschylus in his play, The Eumenides, reconciled man to God by the theory of a suffering Zeus. But in most theologies, the god is supposed to have suffered and died in some remote and mythical period of prehistory. The Christian story, on the other hand, starts off briskly in St. Matthew’s account with a place and date: “When Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea in the days of Herod the King.” St. Luke, still more practically and prosaically, pins the thing down by a reference to a piece of government finance. God, he says, was made man in the year when Caesar Augustus was taking a census in connection with a scheme of taxation. Similarly, we might date an event by saying that it took place in the year that Great Britain went off the gold standard. About thirty-three years later (we are informed), God was executed, for being a political nuisance, “under Pontius Pilate”—much as we might say, “when Mr. Johnson-Hicks was Home Secretary.” It is as definite and concrete as all that.”

“Possibly we might prefer not to take this tale too seriously— there are disquieting points about it. Here we had a man of divine character walking and talking among us—and what did we find to do with him? The common people, indeed, “heard him gladly”; but our leading authorities in Church and State considered that he talked too much and uttered too many disconcerting truths. So we bribed one of his friends to hand him over quietly to the police, and we tried him on a rather vague charge of creating a disturbance, and had him publicly flogged and hanged on the common gallows, “thanking God we were rid of a knave.” All this was not very creditable to us, even if he was (as many people thought and think) only a harmless, crazy preacher. But if the Church is right about him, it was more discreditable still, for the man we hanged was God Almighty.”

“So that is the outline of the official story—the tale of the time when God was the underdog and got beaten, when he submitted to the conditions he had laid down and became a man like the men he had made, and the men he had made broke him and killed him. This is the dogma we find so dull— this terrifying drama of which God is the victim and hero.”scandal-of-the-cross

“If this is dull, then what, in Heaven’s name, is worthy to be called exciting? The people who hanged Christ never, to do them justice, accused him of being a bore—on the contrary, they thought him too dynamic to be safe. It has been left for later generations to muffle up that shattering personality and surround him with an atmosphere of tedium. We have very efficiently pared the claws of the Lion of Judah, certified him “meek and mild,” and recommended him as a fitting household pet for pale curates and pious old ladies. To those who knew him, however, he in no way suggests a milk-and-water person; they objected to him as a dangerous firebrand. True, he was tender to the unfortunate, patient with honest inquirers, and humble before heaven; but he insulted respectable clergymen by calling them hypocrites. He referred to King Herod as “that fox”; he went to parties in disreputable company and was looked upon as a “gluttonous man and a winebibber, a friend of publicans and sinners”; he assaulted indignant tradesmen and threw them and their belongings out of the temple; he drove a coach- and-horses through a number of sacrosanct and hoary regulations; he cured diseases by any means that came handy, with a shocking casualness in the matter of other people’s pigs and property; he showed no proper deference for wealth or social position; when confronted with neat dialectical traps, he displayed a paradoxical humor that affronted serious-minded people, and he retorted by asking disagreeably searching questions that could not be answered by rule of thumb. He was emphatically not a dull man in his human lifetime, and if he was God, there can be nothing dull about God either. But he had “a daily beauty in his life that made us ugly,” and officialdom felt that the established order of things would be more secure without him. So they did away with God in the name of peace and quietness.”

“And the third day he rose again.” What are we to make of this? One thing is certain: if he were God and nothing else, his immortality means nothing to us; if he was man and no more, his death is no more important than yours or mine. But if he really was both God and man, then when the man Jesus died, God died too; and when the God Jesus rose from the dead, man rose too, because they were one and the same person. The Church binds us to no theory about the exact composition of Christ’s Resurrection Body. A body of some kind there had to be since man cannot perceive the Infinite otherwise than in terms of space and time. It may have been made from the same elements as the body that disappeared so strangely from the guarded tomb, but it was not that old, limited mortal body, though it was recognizably like it. In any case, those who saw the risen Christ remained persuaded that life was worth living and death a triviality—and attitude curiously unlike that of the modern defeatist, who is firmly persuaded that life is a disaster and death (rather inconsistently) a major catastrophe.”

“Now, nobody is compelled to believe a single word of this remarkable story. God (says the Church) has created us perfectly free to disbelieve in him as much as we choose. If we do disbelieve, then he and we must take the consequences in a world ruled by cause and effect. The Church says further that man did, in fact, disbelieve, and that God did, in fact, take the consequences. All the same, if we are going to disbelieve a thing, it seems on the whole to be desirable that we should first find out what, exactly, we are disbelieving. Very well, then: “The right Faith is, that we believe that Jesus Christ is God and man, Perfect God and perfect man, of a reasonable soul and human flesh subsisting. Who although he be God and man yet is he not two, but one Christ.” There is the essential doctrine, of which the whole elaborate structure of Christian faith and morals is only the logical consequence.”

“Now, we may call that doctrine exhilarating, or we may call it devastating; we may call it revelation, or we may call it rubbish; but if we call it dull, then words have no meaning at all. That God should play the tyrant over man is a dismal story of unrelieved oppression; that man should play the tyrant over man is the usual dreary record of human futility; but that man should play the tyrant over God and find him a better man than himself is an astonishing drama indeed. Any journalist, hearing of it for the first time, would recognize it as news; those who did hear it for the first time actually called it news, and good news at that; though we are likely to forget that the word Gospel ever meant anything so sensational.

Perhaps the drama is played out now, and Jesus is safely dead and buried. Perhaps. It is ironical and entertaining to consider that at least once in the world’s history those words might have been spoken with complete conviction, and that was upon the eve of the Resurrection.”*empty_tomb11

*From pages 2-7 of Letters to a Diminished Church by Dorothy Sayers.

The 602 Club 23: A Living 1930’s Comic Book

tsc-023-th-square Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow. 

It took four years of blue screen shooting in his living room and work on a Macintosh II for Kerry Conran to complete his black and white short of Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow. Through a friend of his brother’s wife, he was introduced to producer Jon Avnet who shepherded the project into a full-length feature film that would stretch the limits of computer technology.

In this episode of The 602 Club host Matthew Rushing is joined by Megan Calcote and Darren Moser to talk about Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow. We discuss our first encounters with the movie, the story, the revolutionary nature of the film, the look, the fun sci-fi gadgets, the cast and characters, the music, wrapping up with final thoughts, ratings and why everyone should watch Sky Captain.

The 602 Club 22: All Good Dragons Go to Heaven

tsc-022-th-squareDragonheart.

There are so many movies that come out in theaters and most of them will not be a mega hit. A majority of movies come and go with little fanfare after their initial run, yet there are some that find an even greater audience beyond the theater. These films become cult classics.

In this episode of The 602 Club host Matthew Rushing is joined by Suzanne Abbott to talk about the cult classic, Dragonheart. We discuss famous dragons, the big themes of the film, the story, some of our favorite parts, the cast, production value, music and give our ratings.