Film · Movies · Star Wars · Star Wars Rebels · The Clone Wars · The Force Awakens · The Last Jedi · The Rise of Skywalker · Uncategorized

How ‘The Rise of Skywalker’ Helped Me Make Peace With the Sequel Trilogy: A Personal Journey

d0108c1956418882012 was a difficult year for me as a Star Wars fan. Disney bought Lucasfilm from George Lucas and the very first thing they did was cancel a show I was in love with. The Clone Wars had burst on to the big screen in 2008 and immediately captured my heart. The animation would get better as the series continued on the the small screen, but the heart of Star Wars was evident from the beginning. But with one swift stroke of its corporate might, Disney cut it down before The Clone Wars had a chance to properly wrap itself up.

In my mind this was the worst way Disney could introduce themselves as new owners of a franchise I’ve loved since I was 6. It was my birthday the first time I saw the Original Trilogy. We rented the Saga on VHS and my friends and I devoured all three films in one night. In the middle of the night I awoke, popped The Empire Strikes Back, back in the VCR and my journey toward being a fan was complete.

As 2014 rolled around, Disney released it’s first major addition to the Star Wars universe, Star Wars Rebels. I’ll admit that the first season was not it’s best. I had a hard time connecting with what felt like the Disney-ification of the Star Wars (Thankfully the series would grow and become of of my favorite things in the Saga). Which, as I looked towards the upcoming movie, The Force Awakens, didn’t engender a lot of hope.

star-wars-force-awakens-official-posterChristmas of 2015 arrives and so does the first film to continue the Skywalker Saga. There is an awakening of Star Wars mania, the likes that had not been seen since 1999. As the world revels in this new Episode, I struggle. I said then in my review,  “The movie is clearly more worried about appeasing fanboys than truly inspiring the next generation of fans.” I saw the movie 6 times, as I wrestled with how I felt about it and it just never settled for me. From the first viewing, to the last, I was never able to find my peace with the movie. Yet there was always hope, there were more movies to come in the new Trilogy and luckily there were also other Star Wars movies coming in-between Episodes VII and VIII.

The teaser trailer for Rogue One: A Star Wars Story came out in April of 2016 and my first reaction was not great. You can ask my friends, my first thought was, “This looks like Hunger Games in Star Wars.” I’ve never been so thankful to be proven wrong. Rogue One became one of my favorite Star Wars movies of all time. And in that, hope was kindled that Episode VIII would follow in its footsteps.

Celebration Orlando, 2017 was a difficult time for me. It was not the experience I hoped it would be. I missed out on all the exclusives I wanted as well as most of the panels I wanted to be in. The main hall was so small and because of that I would experience the Episode VIII trailer in the overflow room.  But something happened in that room, a small flame was lit, The Last Jedi looked different from The Force Awakens. It actually looked like it was going to do something new, something different! The teaser trailer made me hopeful that this new Episode would be better than VII. I believed that Rian Johnson’s indie background would be a benefit to the story by helping him do something to move the Saga from nostalgia to new territory.

I’ve never been so wrong in my life. VIII made VII look like a masterpiece to me. J.J. Abrams in a recent interview found a way to sum up my feelings perfectly when he told the New York Times, “On the other hand,” he added, “it’s a bit of a meta approach to the story. I don’t think that people go to ‘Star Wars’ to be told, ‘This doesn’t matter.’”

ILMVFX_2017-Oct-09The Last Jedi had taken all the story points from The Force Awakens and told us they were not important. Snoke – you don’t need to know about him. The mystery of who Rey is – not important. The villains like Hux that were so scary in the first movie – actually they are incompetent boobs. Luke Skywalker – not the hero you thought, actually he’s a failure who seems to have learned nothing from his experiences in The Empire Strikes Back and more importantly, The Return of the Jedi. I was devastated. My first viewing’s feelings were only confirmed with each new viewing.

Now, some of these issues were not just the problem of the filmmakers, but they’d started behind the scenes from the moment Disney bought the franchise. They had fast-tracked Episode VII but had never sat down and mapped out where they wanted this new trilogy to go. They had been given outlines from George Lucas but decided that they wanted to move in their own direction. The problem was, they didn’t really know what that direction was, (this is also exemplified in the problems they had with other Star Wars projects and the difficulty of hanging on to directors) other than wanting to recapture the “magic” of the Original Trilogy. There was no consistent creative vision behind the new movies and that became evident with The Last Jedi. With everyone trying to do their own thing, the new trilogy lacked cohesion, leaving Episode IX with the massive task of not only wrapping up this trilogy but the Saga as a whole.

In 2018, Solo: A Star Wars Story was released in theaters. It’s path had been anything but easy. It’s original directors had been fired mid-way through filming, with Ron Howard replacing them. Tasked with bringing the movie in on time, since Bob Iger refused to movie the release date, even though Kathleen Kennedy had asked, Howard pulled off a miracle. Solo was a fantastic movie, but it was not a success. Released a few short months after the divisive Episode VIII, Solo suffered. There was no marketing for the movie, not the kind we’ve come to expect for a Star Wars movie and because of the money that had been spent on extensive reshoots, Solo would be seen as a failure.

RegalMovies_2018-Apr-08Regardless of its “failure” status, Solo was a home run for me. From the moment the movie began, I had a smile on my face that never left. Not only was the movie fun, but it felt like Star Wars. It also did something that I did not think possible, it gave us new things, while at the same time respecting the past. I fell in love with Alden Ehrenreich as Han, yet more importantly, I also fell for the new characters. Qi’ra and Enfys Nest were awesome. The addition of Crimson Dawn to the underworld and the reveal of its leader, left me wanting more of this story. But it also gave me hope. The use of Maul seemed to indicate that the Star Wars films might start to embrace the larger universe as well as reward fans for their loyalty to all Star Wars had to offer. (I’m still hoping Disney will #MakeSolo2Happen)

All of this preamble, to arrive at The Rise of Skywalker. J.J. Abrams was tasked with the impossible, bring the Skywalker Saga to a satisfactory end. He’d not planned on returning, but with the loss of Colin Trevorrow, who was never able to satisfy Lucasfilm with his story ideas, Abrams became the last hope. Abrams had always hinted that he’d had ideas for where he would take the story if he had continued it. The Force Awakens itself was proof that he did, the questions the movie had asked were still waiting to be answered and now he’d been given his shot. He explained his approach well in Vanity Fair, “It felt slightly more renegade; it felt slightly more like, you know, F*%$ it, I’m going to do the thing that feels right because it does, not because it adheres to something.”

With all of the upheaval from 2012 to December 2019, I sat in the theater with absolute trepidation. Would this movie work? Would I like it or would it be another Last Jedi? To my utter surprise, I liked it, from start to finish. It did something I never expected it to be able to, it not only made me like The Force Awakens more, it actually utilized plot elements from The Last Jedi in a way that almost redeemed them in my eyes. It also found a way to bring the Skywalker Saga to a satisfactory close for me.

This last point was the one I had been the most worried about. The story for the Skywalkers seemed to have had the perfect end in The Return of the Jedi, so how could this add anything to that without ruining it?

Abrams and his writing partner, Chris Terrio found their answer in the idea of the Dyad. Rey and Ben Solo being the two that are one really resonates with the rest of the Star Wars canon. It brings to mind the Mortis Arc from The Clone Wars, the daughter and son, as well as the mural on the floor of the first Jedi Temple on Ahch-To, of Jedi Prime. It also made sense in my mind with the prophesy of the Chosen One.

Anakin was the prophesied “Chosen One”, Lucas himself had confirmed that. But was he able to fully complete the mission? I found my in. I contend that his rejection of the call on Mortis and his betrayal of the Jedi allow his sacrifice to bring balance to the Force, but not lasting balance. Now, we know that Anakin was a vergence in the Force, created by the Force itself. Whether Palpatine had anything to do with this is still a question, but we know Palpatine had a child of his own. These two powerful families in the Force destinies became intertwined.

Now without the sacrifice of the Chosen One, all would have been lost, but with his act he enables the Force to continue its work. George Lucas said of Star Wars,

Star Wars has always struck a cord with people. There are issues of loyalty, of friendship, of good and evil…I mean, there’s a reason this film is so popular. It’s not that I’m giving out propaganda nobody wants to hear…Knowing that the film was made for a younger audience, I was trying to say, in a simple way, that there is a God and that there is both a good and bad side. You have a choice between them, but the world works much better if you’re on the good side.”

Choices in Star Wars have always mattered. The choice between a selfish life and that of selflessness are at the core. Anakin’s selfless act at the end of his life continues the thread of the Jedi. That thread of selflessness runs through his son Luke, his daughter Leia and through the son of Palpatine as well. Both sides of the Dyad are drenched in selflessness and compassion. In fact, they are the very thing that the Jedi lost sight of by the time of the Republic’s end, unconditional love. Fear seems to have lead the Jedi to ban attachment. Attachment can lead to jealousy and greed, but it doesn’t have to. Anakin, Luke, Leia, Palpatine’s son, they all show the importance and triumph of unconditional, sacrificial love.

the-art-of-star-wars-the-rise-of-skywalker-kylo-renThe Sith longed to find the way to everlasting life, yet they were always doomed to fail because of their selfishness. The only way to save someone from death is to give up one’s own life. There is always a cost to one’s self to save someone or something else. Rey shows that when she heals the snake, Leia shows that when she uses the last of her life to bring her son back from the dark and Ben does so when he brings Rey back from the brink of death. There is a real beauty to the fact that Ben does the very thing Anakin desired in his fall, bring back the one he loved from the dead. Rey and Ben become one, the light and the dark together, fulfilling the call of the Chosen One to fully bring balance to the Force. Ben finishes what his grandfather began and again, sacrificial love wins.

This was my in. This is the way The Rise of Skywalker helped me find peace with the Sequel Trilogy, because of the way, I feel, it honors what came before, but also adds something new. It stays true to the most important theme of the Star Wars saga and the thing Lucas instilled in it from the beginning, a life of selflessness is better than a life of selfishness. Abrams and Terrio were able to use the questions raised in The Force Awakens and plot points from The Last Jedi to create something that left me satisfied and for that I’ll forever be a grateful fan.

Faith · Movie Review · Movies · Star Wars · The Rise of Skywalker · Uncategorized

Best Movies of 2019 + The Best of the Decade

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These are a list of the best movies that I saw in the theater in 2019.

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From my original review, “The Kid Who Would be King is the perfect movie for families to share together. It brings back the adventure and fun without neglecting important themes that parents and kids can discuss long after the film is over. Movies like this need your support, so take friends and family and enjoy.”

 

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From my original review, “Shazam! is bewitching. It feels like the type of superhero movie that Steven Spielberg might have made in the 80s. The movie’s greatest strength is its stars. Asher Angel as the young Billy Batson, Jack Dylan Grazer as Freddy Freeman and Zachary Levi as Billy/Shazam, make this movie work. They are the heart of the film, in a movie that’s just as much about family, as it is about being a superhero.”

Don’t miss The 602 Club review as well!

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From my original review, “With the three hour run time and the contrivances to overcome Thanos, there are some issues. The movie does feel a bit long, but it also plays out better than Infinity War. Where that movie left you feeling unable to focus because there were so many characters and not a moments rest, Endgame is able to take its time. This may be it’s greatest strength, that you don’t feel rushed, you’re allowed the opportunity to care about what’s happening because you’re not being whiplashed between stories every other minute. For my book, Endgame is the poignantly satisfying conclusion to this part of the Marvel saga I wanted. It is not the perfect movie but it’s the one we deserve.”

Don’t miss The 602 Club review as well!

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Tarantino has crafted a love letter to the 70s as his alternate history version of Sharon Tate’s fate will captivate you from frame one. Leonardo Dicaprio and Brad Pitt give the performances of their careers in this film. This is a long movie, but I was never bored. Tarantino has created something special here, make sure you don’t miss it.

 

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I fell in love with this movie. This film is based on the life of Sarfraz Manzoor and how his love of Bruce Springsteen’s music helped change his life. Set in the middle of the 80s, Javed Khan is the son of Pakistani immigrants, in a small town outside of London, struggling to find his place in the world, when a friend introduces him to the music of The Boss and it completely changes his perspective. It’s one of the best “feel good” movies of the year.

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The hidden gem of the year. The movie is loosely based on Zack Gottsagen’s desire to become an actor, which for the film has been changed to wrestler. Gottsagen shines and Shia LaBeouf is outstanding. This is absolutely a joy to watch and should not be missed. Poignant and funny, make sure you see this movie!

 

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Joker is a staggering work. This movie transcends the comic book genre completely. Joaquin Phoenix is nothing short of brilliant in the title role. He gives the best performance of the year as a man who descends further into the depths insane clarity, leading him to become the most iconic villain of all time, or does he? One of the very best movies of the year.

Don’t miss The 602 Club review as well!

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This is the incredible true story of the Ford Motor Company’s challenge of Ferrari at Le Mans to try to become the first American car company to win the iconic 24 hour race. Matt Damon and Christian Bale are spectacular as Carroll Shelby and Ken Miles. This is one of the best movies about racing I’ve seen and another one of this year’s very best films.

 

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Frozen II is the better of the Frozen films. The movie tackles what it means to grow up, find your place in the world and doing the next right thing. The music is not quite as good as the first movie, but the themes and the animation more than make up for it. This movie is perfect for families and will leave them plenty to talk about once it’s over.

Don’t miss the Cinema Stories and The 602 Club review!

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This is the best film of the year in my book. The movie is inspired by the 1998 article “Can You Say … Hero?” by Tom Junod. It tells the story of journalist Lloyd Vogal who is tasked with profiling Fred Rogers. Through his interactions and conversations with Fred, his eyes are opened to the ways in which his life is broken and his relationships are fractured. The messages in this movie show just how timeless the ideas of Mr. Rogers are and just how much they are needed in our very broken world. Make sure you watch with plenty of Kleenex.

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The first sequel to Jumanji was a complete surprise and thankfully, The Next Level is as well. A rare continuation of a series that is just as good as the previous entry. Honestly that all comes down to the writing which allows for the story to evolve the characters and teach them new lessons and not just feel like a bigger, louder remake. The perfect movie for fun with friends and family!

Don’t miss The 602 Club review!

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This will probably be the most controversial choice on this list, but honestly, I really like this movie. I think what astounds me the most is the way Abrams was able to take elements from The Last Jedi, The Force Awakens as well as ideas from the previous two trilogies and wrap it all up. The movie does suffer from the problems that have plagued the sequels from the beginning, in that there was not a plan in place before they began, so this film has a lot of heavy lifting to do. Because of this, it should have been 3 hours or possibly 2 movies. In the end, I’m happy with it, I have found my “in” for the film and truly enjoyed my time with these characters. I’m thankful that I’ll enjoy Abrams’ sequels as a duology for years to come.

Don’t miss The 602 Club and Aggressive Negotiations‘ reviews!

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For me, this is Eastwood’s best film since Gran Torino. This is one of the most timely movies of the year. Watching the media convict someone in the court of public opinion, highlights what has sadly become common place in today’s society. Paul Walter Hauser and Sam Rockwell give phenomenal performances and this may be the best I have ever seen from Olivia Wilde. This is an important movie that should not be missed.

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Like A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, Little Women is a joyous, heartfelt, sublime film. It’s message of “Do it for someone else” as well as it’s reinforcement that we are not meant to go through life as lone rangers is absolutely perfect. The cast is outstanding and Greta Gerwig has cemented herself as one of the foremost directors in Hollywood. This is in my top three of the year.

Honorable mentions: Where’d You Go, Bernadette, Late Night, Toy Story 4.

My list for best of the decade.

  1. Blade Runner 2049
  2. Interstellar
  3. Batman v Superman: Ultimate Edition 
  4. Skyfall
  5. Mad Max: Fury Road
  6. Inception 
  7. The Descendants 
  8. The Dark Knight Rises
  9. Mission Impossible: Fallout
  10. Joker
  11. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
  12. Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
  13. Logan
  14. Man of Steel
  15. A Quiet Place
  16. Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
  17. The Spectacular Now
  18. Tron Legacy
  19. Moonrise Kingdom
  20. Hell or High Water
  21. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
  22. Solo: A Star Wars Story
  23. Captain America: Winter Soldier
  24. The Social Network
  25. The Man from UNCLE
Film · Movie Review · Movies · Podcasts · Star Wars · The Rise of Skywalker · Uncategorized

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker – Review

I have thought about writing a written review for this, but there is so much to talk about that I am not sure I would do it the justice I have on the podcasts I’ve recorded. I may still sit down and write something, possibly a series, focused on key areas, but until then, please enjoy my thoughts on Aggressive Negotiations and The 602 Club!

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Issue 192: Skywalker Risen.

A long time have they waited…and you have too. It’s the inevitable reaction show to Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker from the Jedi Masters themselves.

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The 602 Club 263: The Power of Sacrifice

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker.

The wait is over, the final film in the Skywalker saga is here, again (for those that are old enough to remember the last time it was here with Revenge of the Sith) and JJ Abrams is back to wrap up this Sequel Trilogy that he began in 2015 with The Force Awakens.

In this episode of The 602 Club hosts Matthew Rushing and Christy Morris welcome Bruce Gibson to talk about Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker. We discuss leaving the theater, Rey’s answers, the Dyad, Bendemption, confronting fear, the rise of Palpatine…again, new and old characters, the Sith, The First Order, The Final Order, too many reversals, old friends return, the final score and our ratings.

Book Reviews · Books · Star Wars · Uncategorized

Force Collector – Review

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Don’t miss The 602 Club podcast review!

The Journey to The Rise of Skywalker continues with the young adult novel, Force Collector by Kevin Shinick. Imagine you’re growing up in the Star Wars universe sometime after the fall of the Empire. The Jedi are myths that have almost been forgotten. You have a strange ability to see visions when you touch certain objects, but the only one that believes you and tries to help you is your grandmother. This is Karr’s life. When his grandmother dies, it leads him on an adventure with his new friend Maize and his trusty droid, RZ-7 to uncover the history of the Jedi and his place in the story of the galaxy. In an echo of Lost Stars, Karr’s journey will allow him to experience important moments in the Jedi’s past, visit some of the most important places and become a historian of things that should not have been lost.

The Importance of History 

They say history is written by the victors and for the Jedi this means that the lies perpetrated through Palpatine’s propaganda have become what most of the citizens of the galaxy believe about the them. Karr’s journey leads him to discover the truth about the Jedi and their place in the galactic story. One of the beauties of this is how it reinforces the importance of history. And it’s not just history, but it’s the dedication to remembering and passing on the truth, the good and the bad. It’s only through the truth of the past that we can know what is important for the future.

This impact of history is not just about the vast movings of galactic empires and republics, but also the history of individuals. Karr is able to discover along the way, not just the history of the Jedi, but of himself as well, his family and the two things, when put together, help him find his place in the story of the galaxy. History helps give Karr the context to choose the wisest path for himself and how he can best help righting the narrative about the Jedi.

The Book

Shinick has a great style for Star Wars, his prose fits the sarcastic, serial dialogue of the series. His character of Karr, who’s power in the Force will remind readers of Quinlan Vos, is a very unique creation. It’s rare that Star Wars tells the story of a Force user that does not lead them to becoming a Jedi or Sith and because this is not where Karr’s story goes it makes him fascinating. There are so many ways this character could be used in The Rise of Skywalker and beyond and will leave readers hoping his story is not complete. Maize has the roguishness of Han Solo and the sarcasm. She’s a good foil for Karr, while Rz-7 is the classic droid sidekick that is a must for a Star Wars adventure.

I was surprised how much I loved this book. The way it dove into Jedi lore made me hungry for more. I hope that Kevin Shinick will be allowed to follow up on this character and allow him to interact with someone like Rey and other Force sensitives in the Sequel era. Force Collector is rated 4 out of 5 stars.

This review was completed using a copy of Force Collector provided by Disney Lucasfilm Press.

This review originally appeared on The Star Wars Report.

Book Reviews · Books · Star Wars · The Rise of Skywalker · Uncategorized

Resistance Reborn – Review

Don’t miss The 602 Club review!

“A choice to be better” – Poe Dameron

resistance-reborn-final-coverWhen The Last Jedi ended, the Resistance found itself shattered, what was left of it fit abroad the Millennium Falcon plus there were the pilots of Black Squadron who’d defended Ikkrukk against the First Order and what was left of Inferno Squad. It’s not a lot to work with as Resistance Reborn begins. Leia and Poe are left with the task to trying to rebuild the Resistance from scratch, as well as figure out why all of their allies seem to be disappearing.

Redemption and Action

The Last Jedi held a hard lesson for Poe Dameron. His impulsive behavior lead to the deaths of many in the Resistance and this weighs heavily on him throughout the story of Resistance Reborn. The title is apt as Poe and many others in the Resistance find themselves in need of a rebirth. Actions they have taken have lead to harm, destruction and even death, as Poe says in a speech he gives. And yet the choice is clear, they must face the consequences for their actions, learn from their mistakes and move forward, because quitting is just not an option in the face of the First Order’s evil.

Redemption is such a big theme in the history of Star Wars and yet being redeemed is not just about turning from previous choices, it’s also about actively changing your ways and putting yourself on a new path so that those mistakes don’t reoccur. Poe particularly finds himself in a place where penance for his mistakes is the best way to earn the redemption needed to help Leia lead the fledgling Resistance. It’s such a timeless story of personal responsibly and more important than ever in today’s world.

The Book

There are so many surprises in this book that author Rebecca Roanhouse has in store and it’s best to allow readers to experience those surprises as they read, therefore they won’t be spoiled here. What makes this book so much fun is the reward that it is for those that have been reading the new Star Wars canon material since the beginning. This book pulls from the Aftermath books, Bloodline, the Poe Dameron comics, the Battlefront II storyline and so much more to tell it’s story. In many ways it feels like the Legends books that were able to pull in any character, at any time and use them. Resistance Reborn is the kind of book fans have been waiting for since 2015 and is most definitely a must read before seeing The Rise of Skywalker. Resistance Reborn is rate 4.5 out of 5 stars.

This review was completed using a copy of Resistance Reborn was provided by Del Rey Publishing.

This post originally appeared on The Star Wars Report.

Book Reviews · Books · Galaxy's Edge · Star Wars · Uncategorized

Galaxy’s Edge: Black Spire – Review

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This review originally appeared on The Star Wars Report. Don’t miss The 602 Club Review!

Most of the Resistance did get wiped out by the First Order, but that’s the tricky thing about doing what’s right and fighting the good fight: people just keep doing it no matter what.”

Black Spire p. 221

The celebration for the opening of Galaxy’s Edge continues as Del Rey Books releases Delilah S. Dawson’s Black Spire. Picking up where her previous book Phasma left off, as well as the events of The Force Awakens and The Last Jedi, Vi Moradi is tasked with helping the decimated Resistance by traveling to Black Spire Outpost on Batuu to set up a new base and recruit. Unfortunately for her, she’s not going alone, as General Leia sends her with Archex, who was formally known as Cardinal of the First Order, newly deprogramed and freed. What could go possibly go wrong?

Freedom Isn’t Free

One of the stand out themes of Black Spire is something Vi struggles with while trying to recruit new members for the Resistance among the denizens of BSO. She finds that most people are of the opinion that if they keep their noses out of galactic affairs they will be safe from the tyranny of the First Order. She is frustrated with the lack of interest in the common good and reminds them that, “…if you keep letting bullies bully other people, eventually they run out of other people.”(p.164). It brings to mind the age old adage about evil flourishing when good people do nothing. Vi’s pleading with them harkens back to Obi-Wan telling the gungans in The Phantom Menace, “You and the Naboo form a symbiont circle. What happens to one of you will affect the other. You must understand this.”. It’s a lesson that the Star Wars galaxy struggles mighty with but it’s also one that feels universal for the real world as well. The fight for freedom and the protection of it takes constant vigilance. It’s a fight that can happen in many different ways, but the commitment must be total and the character arcs of this book illustrate that perfectly.

The Trauma of Life

Life has a way of beating people down and Black Spire is very much about the ways people deal with the trauma that happens along the way. Vi is suffering from the torture she received at the hands of Cardinal which continues to give her nightmares. Archex has lost his entire way of life. He’s been a slave for most of it, being told what to do, what to believe and how to behave since birth, first in a Jakku orphanage and then as a “recruit” for the First Order. The psychological trauma of going from never having to make up his mind about anything and always know his purpose, to feeling broken and purposeless has taken it’s toll. He sums up his feelings when he says, “I’ve been through some bad things…People have hurt me. Most of the time, I manage to ignore it to hide it, but it’s always there, lurking underneath. And what I’ve learned is that the only way out is through. That I have to feel the fear, acknowledge it, and do it anyway. Fear can’t hurt you.'(p. 282)

His John Wayne philosophy of, “Being scared to death and saddling up anyway” is at the heart of each one of the characters in the book. Each one is having to face a fear, brought on by the trials of life and the only way to get over them is to deal with them head on. It truly is a beautiful reminder that the only thing that can beat us is us, if we give up; that’s when we lose.

The Book

The Galaxy’s Edge series has been about introducing fans to the new planet and location for the theme parks. Yet what sets Black Spire apart from A Crash of Fate is that it truly makes you feel like you know this place. Dawson’s descriptions are fantastic, but more importantly she brings BSO to life through the characters and their experience in this world. The book also does an incredible job of following up The Last Jedi and through this story of absolute desperation showing just how fragile the Resistance is after their narrow escape on Crait. With all of the themes talked about, you’d think this book is dower and serious and yet Dawson’s wicked sense of humor and sarcasm are on full display through the characters. This adds the levity needed in the story and truly makes the book a joy to read. Black Spire helps fill in the gap between The Last Jedi and The Rise of Skywalker perfectly and is the perfect way to fill the time waiting for Episode IX. Black Spire is rated 4.25 out of 5 stars.

This review was completed using a copy of Galaxy’s Edge: Black Spire provided by Del Rey.

Book Reviews · Books · Galaxy's Edge · Star Wars · Uncategorized

A Crash of Fate – Review

iu-2This review originally appeared on The Star Wars Report. Don’t miss The 602 Club review!

“I know the galaxy will never be big enough to fill that emptiness in you heart, Izzy, because you don’t want it to. You want to keep running because you wound’t know what to do if you had to stop.” A Crash of Fate pg. 241-242

Since the sale of Lucasfilm to Disney in 2012, the public has eagerly anticipated, what would be named Galaxy’s Edge, that has opened at the Disney theme parks in California and Florida. To celebrate and promote the new parks, the publishing line of Star Wars books and comics has been readying fans for their visit with stories that take place on the world of Batuu and the Black Spire Outpost there, which is the place fans can visit. Black Spire Outpost was mentioned in Solo: A Star Wars Story, it was featured in Thrawn: Alliances, there is a comic series about it and both arms of publishing have books being released in the month of August 2019 staring it. First up is A Crash of Fate by Zoraida Córdova.

A Need To Be Loved

The story of A Crash of Fate is a simple one. Jules and Izzy are best friends growing up on Batuu until one night Izzy and her family leave unexpectedly. As fate would have it, Izzy returns to Batuu for a smuggling job and her and Jules are thrust together after years apart. As they work to stay alive and complete the mission, they must deal with the unresolved feelings they have for one another that have resurfaced throughout their day on Batuu.

There is a beautiful theme that runs through the story. Izzy has been left alone in the universe with the death of both of her parents. Her mother had taught her that to survive, you can only rely on yourself, which has led to a very lonely life. She begins to question this worldview in her time with Jules. She finds that deep longing that all beings have, to be known and loved by someone. She struggles with the desire to belong to a family and to have a home, when all of her experiences have told her that you can’t trust either. The story plays this out well as Izzy realizes throughout the story that not only was her mother wrong, but that she can be known and loved, not just by Jules, but by the people of Black Spire Outpost as well. It’s a good reminder of the importance of community in our lives and that life is much better as part of group than as a lone ranger.

The Book

The theme of the book is good, but the story itself does have some issues. One: it is a terribly cliched love story. Unlike all of the other Young Adult books so far in the new canon, A Crash of Fate is never able to transcend it’s genre, it’s firmly intrenched in the YA tropes. Now this is not bad per say, since it is a YA book, but it is disappointing with the track record these books have so far. Second: because the book is based on Batuu, most fans won’t have any connection to the place unless they have been to Galaxy’s Edgealready. Since this book has nothing familiar, in either characters or place, it is hard to feel like it matters much in the canon of stories. Lastly: the story has very few connections with the larger Star Warsuniverse. It takes place after the destruction of Hosnian Prime in The Force Awakens, with some very tangential connections to Resistance and First Order activity on Batuu, but it’s just not enough to actually feel important. With these issues, A Crash of Fate is mildly entertaining but inconsequential, it is rated 3 out of 5 stars.

This review was completed using a copy of A Crash of Fate  provided by Disney Lucasfilm Press.