Tag Archives: Star Wars

The State of Luke Skywalker

This blob was originally posted on NJOE.com years ago and I just came across it in my old documents. Thought I would post it here as nostalgic Star Wars reading.

anewhope“For over a thousand generations the Jedi Knights were the guardians of peace and justice in the Old Republic. Before the dark times. Before the Empire.”

The Jedi had been a force of peace and justice. As Mace Windu says, they were keepers of the peace – not soldiers. They stood the test of time and conflict and helped shape the galaxy; then war came. The Jedi were thrown into a role that they did not belong to. They were forced into morally compromising situations and made to choose the lesser of two evils. The Clone Wars created a cloud, along with the dark side of the Force, to ensnare the Jedi into become soldiers, not keepers of the peace. As war went on, it claimed many Jedi and not just their lives, it began to eat at the heart of the Order. They lost sight of what was truly important and became slaves to a failed government, instead of following the Force. In the end, as history shows, all were lost but two (there may be more that George has not reveled yet). Obi-Wan Kenobi and Yoda bridged that divide to raise up a new Jedi Knight to restore peace and justice to the galaxy.

Luke Skywalker has been questioned of late. His characterization is said to be off; it is said that he is no longer that “farm-boy” that we all know and love. He seems cooler and less willing to trust and look for the good in people. Is this the case and is it really uncharacteristic?

Luke has not had an easy life. His aunt and uncle murdered, his hand cut off by his Sith father, and almost electrocuted to death by The Emperor. His training was woefully short as a Jedi, he fell to the dark side for a while… and then there is an endless list of super weapons, warlords, madmen and women that he had to face, Sith, kidnappings of family members, the loss of many loves, the loss of close friends, the death of his youngest nephew, the loss of his oldest nephew turned Sith who was taken down by his niece, and the death of his wife to his nephew-turned-Sith. All of this is surrounded by, and couched in, over 40 years of unrest and war with one group after another. All while trying to find the New Jedi Order’s place in the New Republic/Galactic Alliance. This man is lucky to be alive, let alone sane.

War, as can be seen in the days of Kenobi and Yoda, had a wearing, gnawing effect on the Jedi. Attachments to governments instead of the will of the Force also led to misplaced loyalty and, in the end, devastation of the Order. The Jedi had failed to live for the Force, instead fighting and dying for the status-quo. It was only through Kenobi and Yoda, sitting under the tutelage of Qui-Gon and 20 years of contemplation, that they could see the error of their ways and begin to work their way back to The Jedi Code:

                      “There is no emotion, there is peace.

                   There is no ignorance, there is knowledge.

                      There is no passion, there is serenity.

                      There is no death, there is the Force.”

Luke has been battered by the galaxy. Yes, he was that optimistic farm-boy and still is in some ways. Yet, as the years have gone by, he has changed. He is more reserved and cautious. His desire to trust everyone has gotten him into trouble more times than he can count, so he has tempered it with wisdom and discretion. A person cannot be expected to be the same after more than 40 years of conflict, war and death. Just because Luke is a Jedi does not mean he is immune to the pain and anguish that the galaxy has to offer. If Luke was still just as naïve and wet-behind-the-ears as he was in the films, he would be the worst written character ever. But the Luke of Return of the Jedi is much more mature than just a few short years ago. His experiences molded him and honed his character, and they continue to do so throughout the books (even if he does get a little whiny now and again).

Caedus_EAA lot of fans were very disappointed in Luke’s refusal to try to redeem Jacen, feeling that it was out of character for him. And yet Luke does try to reach Jacen and get him to see the error of his ways, but it is too late in the end. Jacen is too far gone. Jacen chose to believe that only he could save the universe and only he could truly understand what must be done. It is the height of arrogance and pride to believe that only you can do something. It is written, “Pride comes before disaster, and arrogance before a fall.” Jacen is guilty of this fault and it led him to becoming unreachable. He became lost in his reason and blind to anything but his own power and will to change the “future.”

Luke is not beyond fault here, though. He should have been more involved in Jacen’s life, especially after his ordeal with Vergere. Luke was woefully negligent in allowing Jacen to just leave for five years, unsupervised, to wander the galaxy and collect Force knowledge.  Dexter Jettster said it best: “I should think that you Jedi would have more respect for the difference between knowledge and wisdom.” Luke’s greatest mistake was not being there to temper what Jacen learned, to teach him with the wisdom that comes from experience and the guidelines of the New Jedi Order’s code,

Jedi are the guardians of peace in the galaxy.

Jedi use their powers to defend and to protect.

Jedi respect all life, in any form.

Jedi serve others rather than ruling over them, for the good of the galaxy.

Jedi seek to improve themselves through knowledge and training.

Knowledge that is molded by nothing is dangerous.

VestaraAnother major complaint leveled at Luke was his mistrust and (some say) mistreatment of Vestara Khai. They point out that Luke saved Vader from the dark side, so why could he not have some faith that Vestara could perhaps follow on that same path. Darth Vader is a very different person. He was not raised evil or Sith – he was a boy, a kind and gentle boy who “….knows nothing of greed.” It is this that makes The Phantom Menace so important. It lays the foundation for why Anakin could be turned in Return of the Jedi – he was never fully evil to begin with. The same argument can be made with Kyp Durron. Again he was not evil, but possessed by evil and made to do terrible things.

Vestara is a very different character than these two. She is raised her whole life to be a Sith, to live according to their code and cherish their values. A lifetime of teaching is not easily, if ever, undone. Unlike Vader, which Luke can sense good in, Vestara can never truly be read by Luke. Her core being is concealed in the web of lies that she spins and truly believes. Yes she loves Ben in her own way, and is attracted to certain aspects of the Jedi way of life, yet she is never able to let go of her attachment to the Sith way of thinking.  In the end, her very way of thinking is antithetical to the Jedi code. She is unwilling to sacrifice her attachments and, in true Sith fashion, is willing to give up vital information to save herself instead of lay down her life for others. So, is it cold and unfeeling for Luke to be wary of someone like this, especially when his own son is involved? Has Luke not just had his nephew fall to the dark side and seen the repercussions of that on his son, his wife and the galaxy? How could Luke be anything but cautious and circumspect of this Sith teenager? This is not callous, it is wisdom born of over 40 years of hard learned lessons.

There are many things that Luke needs to change and he has many mistakes to try and rectify. The first is being tied to a government. Luke has already begun down this path; he has removed the Order from Coruscant and set it up elsewhere. This is a wise move and it detaches the Jedi from the government in a good way, enabling them to focus on the Force and not the political machinations that are always swirling about. What is right is too big to be attached to any one form of government.

The second issue is the lack of training structure in the New Jedi Order. This was one of the things that the old Order did well. It had a very regimented and thorough program to train Jedi and guide them in the wisdom of the Force. Luke needs to be more hands-on in the shaping and training of the Jedi, as do the other masters. Good training and wise teaching are essential in raising up strong future Jedi. As can be seen throughout all of the Star Wars timelines, knowledge and power without wisdom has deadly consequences for the galaxy.

There is also the issue of Luke holding fast to these visions of the “future.” Yoda said, “Always in motion is the future.” Luke should be careful to not hold fast to these visions as gospel and instead be looking to the Force and focusing on the here and now. Being preoccupied with the future has never worked out well for the Jedi – just ask Zayne Carrick. The biggest problem with knowing the future, though, is that Luke is being forced down a certain path because of the Legacy comics, creating a huge problem in allowing the story to feel organic or true to this axiom of Yoda’s.

Luke_ghostThe last thing to mention (even though there are many more) is that Luke needs a timeout. Like Obi-Wan and Yoda, Luke is in need of some space to contemplate his actions and the effect that he has had on the universe. He needs to be able to reevaluate the course of the New Jedi Order and rethink his role in it. All of the conflicts and wars have left Luke very little time to do any this and he has had the weight of the galaxy riding on his shoulders for far too long. There are many foes that are still lurking in the shadows and to face them, Luke needs a gut check. Who is he? Who has he become? What can he learn from his successes and, more importantly, his failures? Where has he gone wrong in the first place? Has he lost too much of his optimism in light of the ever encroaching darkness? Here’s to hoping that the authors of Luke’s future will give him the time to rest and take it all in. If a person always has to react to a new crisis without the time to process the last, they can never truly learn and grow. If given this time Luke may be able to become an even better Jedi and man for the galaxy; so lets give the man a break and let him go pick up some power converters or a good cup of caf at Cafbucks.

Thrawn – Review

thrawn12f-2-webThis review originally appeared at The Star Wars Report.

It is said that to create a compelling villain an author must make them sympathetic in some way. Villains never see themselves as such, as with the rest of us, they believe they are doing the right thing. Timothy Zahn, in his new book Thrawn, has given us just that; a villain that believes he’s doing what he must to save his people and possibly the galaxy itself from an evil worse that the Empire. Thrawn is a masterpiece in subverting the readers expectations, especially in light of Star Wars Rebels. Many readers will come in expecting the ruthless, cold and calculating character they know from the show, yet that is only one side of the multifaceted Chiss. Zahn has created the most nuanced Imperial to date allowing readers a both, insider and outsider’s look at the Empire.

Breaking the Mold

One of the true highlights of the book is this theme. Both Thrawn and Arihnda Pryce (who fans will recognize as the Governor of Lothal in Star Wars Rebels) must overcome the prejudices of the Empire throughout the story. The Empire is one of the most elitist and xenophobic places you will read about in literature. The Core systems in the galaxy have very little regard for aliens or people from the Outer Rim or beyond. Each of these characters has at least one of these strikes against them and Thrawn has both. Thrawn and Arihnda must overcome these prejudices. They never feel sorry for themselves or blame the system they are apart of, they simply overcome the obstacles in their own way, though determination, hard work and in Arihnda’s case, foul play.

It’s actually incredible to watch Thrawn continually prove his naysayers wrong and obliterate their preconceptions about him, time and time again. He uses all of his talents and skills to his advantage, making himself invaluable to the Emperor and the Imperial Navy. Strange to think one could learn a valuable life lesson from Thrawn, but he never allows anyone else to define his worth, value or to be held back from completing his objectives. Of course, full disclosure, Thrawn is not a perfect role model, but this was a great theme to see play out in the book.

Thrawn_&_Pryce

The Story

Thrawn is an expansive novel that covers a lot of time. It also allows us to get that look inside the Empire, but from the outsider’s perspective. Because Thrawn is not human, he does not always see things the same way and this sheds light on much of the corruption in the Empire as well as the inefficiencies. The story does a good job of sucking the reader in and created a subtle enough character with Thrawn that you are on his side during the book.

Zahn also creates, for this book, a new person to be at Thrawn’s side, his name is Eli Vanto. Think of him as the Watson to Thrawn’s Sherlock. This is a really fascinating character that, by the end of the book you’ll be begging Zahn for more.

As is mentioned above, the story features Arihnda Pryce. The book is set up to parallel her rise to power and Thrawn’s, seeing the different ways they overcome the obstacles to get where we see them in Rebels. She is not to be trifled with and her story is every bit as interesting as the title character. There are many familiar faces in the book, that fans would come to expect from a story tied in with Star Wars Rebels as Yularan, Grand Moff Tarkin, the Emperor and a few more are sprinkled in .

Conclusion

This review is not meant to be expansive and in many areas I wanted to be vague because it’s a book that just needs to be read and experience. Zahn has done exactly what I hoped for and written the definitive, canon book of Thrawn. It ranks up there with the very best of the new canon and is rated 5 out of 5 turbo laser blasts.

This review was completed using a copy of Thrawn provided by Del Rey.

Aggressive Negotiations Contest

ancontest1The Star Wars podcast that I do with John Mills is doing a review contest on iTunes. We are offering an ultra exclusive t-shirt to the winner. All you need to do is leave a star rating and review for the show in iTunes (only open to the US) to be entered in the drawing. Even those who previously wrote reviews will be entered. You’ll get the awesome shirt pictured here in your size. All for about 2 minutes to help out our show! Please share with as many people as you can and best of luck! Contest ends May 1st.

Aftermath: Empire’s End – Review

stl031528

Get The 602 Club episode review!

link-badge-itunes

This review was originally posted at The Star Wars Report.

Star Wars fans’ first taste of the end of the Empire came in Lost Stars as the Imperial characters in that book experienced the Battle of Jakku. It was the first taste of the end of all things for the Empire as seen in The Original Trilogy. Now, in Chuck Wendig’s final Aftermath book, Empire’s End, fans finally have the particulars of what led to the showdown between the Empire and the New Republic over this remote world.

Is This All There Is?

This series has followed two big characters, Rae Sloane and Norra Wexley. Each of these women has been moving closer to the other throughout the story, and it’s in this book that they come face to face at last. What’s most interesting is that even though they are on opposite sides of the war, they find themselves driven by the same thing, revenge. Each woman wants revenge on the person they believe has taken everything away from them. Norra desires revenge on Rae for attacking the New Republic and for brainwashing her husband to help carry out the plan. Rae’s object of revenge is Gallius Rax, who has taken the Empire she loves away from her. As these two women wrestle with how to get their revenge they see that they are truly not that different from one another and are even left with the same question plaguing them: “Is this all there is?” Is revenge truly enough to live for? Their answers will be different in the end, but the outcome will be the same. Revenge is not enough.

raenorra

Who is the Enemy?

Building off the previous theme is also this question, “Who is the enemy?” Norra will find that in the end, her understanding of the answer to that question was wrong and she must put aside her presuppositions about Rae, specifically, to fight the right fight.

What is most interesting is to see the way this struggle is mirrored on a galactic scale and how it will plague the sequel trilogy of Star Wars. The New Republic and Mon Mothma specifically have grappled with the challenge of identifying who the enemy is and what actual threat that enemy poses. All throughout the Aftermath series she’s longed to have peace and put war behind her. She might have been too late to act correctly if not pushed by her opponent in the upcoming election to take a strong stance on the security of the New Republic. Seeing the galaxy the way it is and not as she wants it to be is hard for Mon Mothma, but in the fight to bring democracy, the lesson that freedom is never free cannot be lost.

Finding the medium between safety and freedom is never easy. Sinjar says of Mon Mothma she is, “…a woman that wants to give democracy to the entirety of the galaxy. Freedom for all. Oppression for none.” It truly is the noblest of goals. The book does a good job of showing this struggle in all its messiness.

It is fascinating to see how this connects to The Force Awakens. Ancillary materials fill in the details of a senate that does not wish to see the First Order as a threat. Because of their lack of understanding of what’s truly happening in the galaxy, or worse, a blatant disregard for the signs before them, their blindness becomes their doom. A poignant lesson in any galaxy.

Spoilers begin after this point


The Good

The book has some things worthy of praise. The plot. The plot of the book is honestly what many expected from the first book. The portrayal of the inner-workings of the New Republic, seeing characters like Mon Mothma and Leia in their roles, trying to take care of the Empire while at the same time transitioning to a new galactic government, is excellent.

The book also continues one of the best things about the series, the Empire. The power plays and infighting between Grand Admiral Sloan and Gallius Rax as they try to find a way forward for the fledgling Empire are great. Another standout comes in the character of Rax and the revelation of his connection with Palpatine, Jakku, and what’s happening there, ultimately leading to the formation of the First Order.

The Bad

Empire’s End, like the rest of the series suffers from Wendig’s prose; it’s just frustratingly prosaic. There is also a lack of exposition and detail with major plot points, such as the Black Sun and Red Key crime syndicate’s involvement in the attempt to destabilize the galaxy or the full scope of Palpatine’s contingency plan. Each would benefit from more explanation and detail. There are also times throughout  where there seems to be a jump in the story and fuller connection of the dots would be welcome. This is so important because tie-in fiction that’s being written concurrently with a tv series or films will always come in second to those mediums. The major revelations will inevitably be saved for the next movie or episode, and because of this, it’s a struggle for the books to feel important. The Aftermath books suffer from this problem. There really are no major revelations in them and it leaves the series feeling a bit hollow. Therefore good writing is essential to making the reader feel they are being rewarded for their time and that the book is necessary to the canon.

The interludes continue to be an issue. Most of them are unnecessary. With all of the pre-release hullabaloo about Jar Jar’s fate, the actual reveal lacks any punch. The interludes that do work would be better served by being worked into the narrative in a more organic way. The space for the others could better be utilized to flesh out the main plot with more detail.

Most frustratingly, the character’s voices still sound off. Han and Leia do not sound like themselves. Tie-in fiction, when it is at its best, plays like an extension of the show or film it draws from. The best way for that to happen is to capture the “voices” of the characters so that the reader can hear the actor in their heads as they read. Unfortunately for this book, just as in Life Debt, this does not happen.

Conclusion 

Empire’s End is an improvement on the previous two books in the series. The plot is more engaging and seeing the end to the Empire is enjoyable. But with continuing prose, “voice” and importance issues, it’s still not one of the new canon’s best, landing somewhere in the middle with a rating of 2.75 downed Star Destroyers out of 5.

ee1

Rogue One Novelization – Review


rogueonenovelRogue One
 brings to life the crawl from A New Hope, vividly showing us just how difficult that first victory against the evil Empire was and who carried out that harrowing mission. Rogue One: A Star Wars Story has also been novelized by Twilight Company author Alexander Freed. He is the perfect choice as author, capturing all the grit of Star Wars‘ first true war film, just as he did in his Battlefront tie-in.

The goal of any movie novelization is to adequately represent the story on screen as well as give you all those little insights as only a book can. It’s here that Freed excels. The way in which he poignantly dives into the psyche of key characters gives the reader a greater understanding of the motivation as portrayed on screen, expanding the resonance of their actions and decisions. It’s wonderful to hear Jyn’s internal wrestling about her father, Cassian’s struggle as he contemplates his orders to shoot Galen or Mon Mothma’s feelings about the Rebellion and the course they are on. Each addition enhances the film and helps make this novelization worth the time and money.

The new canon of Star Wars introduced a new feature that has now been seen in the Aftermath books, Ahsoka and are featured in Freed’s novelization, interludes.  In previous books they have been used to varying degrees of success and the trend is much the same here. Some of the interludes do feel like they add to the story, but for the most part, they don’t feel necessary. Honestly the new canon authors should work harder to integrate this material into the actual flow of the stories or do without it. Here they feel more like interruptions, especially since almost everyone reading the book will be familiar with the flow of the movie.

The rest of the review can be found in it’s original location at The Star Wars Report.

George Lucas: A Life – Review

tumblr_o61hphwviy1us2txqo1_1280George Lucas: A Life by Brian Jay Jones.

George Lucas is one of the most enigmatic and fascinating people in Hollywood, although he’d probably resent that statement as his whole life has been about not being part of they Hollywood system. In this new, non-authorized biography, Brian Jay Jones traces Lucas’ quintessentially American story from humble beginnings to titan of the film industry.

The book is split in to 3 parts, Hope, Empire and Return, each on taking on a different part of George’s life and doing their best to synthesize a very full existence in a mere 550 pages (really only 470 as the last 80 pages are notations).

Hope is actually the the best section of the book, chronicling Lucas’ family and his early life as a greaser who found school boring and working for someone else even more so. This is the most formative section of the book, much of who Lucas became would be a direct result of things that happened during this period. The issues with his father (which would play in in his two biggest franchises), his desire to be completely free to do things his way and a car accident that would illuminate the truth of life’s fragility cementing his character. The reason for most everything else Lucas would do in his life could be traced back to his beginnings in Modesto, California.

tumblr_nzgatkbrg01qz6jndo1_1280

Empire tells of Lucas’ fortunes after American Graffiti as he struggle to bring his idea of The Star Wars to screen. Next to his youth, this is the the most integral to who Lucas would become. His experiences with THX-1138 and American Graffiti would set him on course to chart a future away from the influence of the studio and Hollywood system. Everything he did was a move to allow him to make movies without compromising his artistic creativity as well as building a place where others in the industry would be able to do the same. This same drive would also cost him dearly, as he neglected his wife in favor of making his movies and the neglect would cost him his marriage.

Return recounts the journey from the Original Trilogy to the Prequels and the sale of Lucasfilm to Disney. It’s the weakest section of the book, feeling too condensed and too reliant on the most superficial understanding of the Prequels as well as the work that truly went into them. It sadly glosses over the importance of The Clone Wars series as well, making it feel more like a footnote than the project that helped Lucas fall in love with Star Wars all over again. Also left out is the fight with Marin County which lead Lucas to giving up his dream of making the Star Wars sequel trilogy himself and the resignation of selling the company to Disney.

The one true strength in this section is the way it highlights the correlation between Lucas, his divorce and the story of the Prequel Trilogy, especially, Anakin and his choices. After reading this book one can see how much of himself he actually poured into the story. Anakin and Lucas both have the same fall on their way to Empire-building.

lucasWith the strength of the first two sections the book is recommendable, yet it’s not without it’s faults. Frustratingly the last section does devolve into most every criticism of Lucas in the Special Edition to Disney sale that everyone has surely read online. Honestly this can be attributed to the non-authorized nature of the book and the lack of interviews, which would have helped the last section of the book specifically. Peter Jackson is quoted in the book saying about Lucas, “I can’t help feeling that George Lucas has never been fully appreciated by the industry for his remarkable innovations…He’s the Thomas Edison of the modern film industry.” In some ways the book leaves one feeling this way as well. Lucas’ accomplishments in film, his tireless struggle for innovation and consistently putting his hard-earned money where his mouth is, should be given more due. Hopefully this is just the beginning of books to come out about Lucas and here’s to hoping the next is even more in depth, but Jones’ book is a good place to start and is rated 4 out of 5 Death Stars.

 

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story – Review

rogueone_onesheetaGet The 602 Club episode here!

link-badge-itunes

“It is a period of civil war. Rebel spaceships, striking from a hidden base, have won their first victory against the evil Galactic Empire.

During the battle, Rebel spies managed to steal secret plans to the Empire’s ultimate weapon, the DEATH STAR, an armored space station with enough power to destroy an entire planet.”

These words are the first thing that anyone ever saw of Star Wars as the film opened in 1977 and now Gareth Edwards has imbued them fully in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.

Hope Anew

The Rebellion’s struggle just got worse, as it learns that the Empire has created a world-killing weapon named the Death Star. The Rebellion finds itself on the knife’s edge between hope and despair. The council of the Rebellion cannot decide what to do. Do they risk it all by trying to steal the plans, or do they resign themselves to defeat and despair? Jyn challenges the council, “What chance do we have? The question is what choice”. She implores the council to remember that if they do nothing then they’ve sealed the fate of the galaxy and that evil this great cannot go unopposed. It brings to mind Edmund Burke’s famous saying, “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.” She encourages them with a refrain Cassian Andor said to her earlier in the movie, “Rebellions are built on hope”. Hope changes everything, it reminds people that the way it is, is not how it has to be. Hope is the spark that, if kindled, creates the fire of change. Change is possible, but it takes sacrifice, determination and some times, lives to see it come about. “So now faith, hope, and love abide, these three; but the greatest of these is love.” It takes faith, faith that a difference can be made, which births hope and it’s all because the love of something greater than themselves leads them to live out the truth that, “Greater love has no one than this, that someone lay down his life for his friends.”

The beauty of the film is that hope is not just a figment of the heroes imaginations. The Force seems quite active, even without the Jedi. It’s moving in mysterious ways and bringing people together that can make a difference. This band of rogues does the impossible, one chance at a time, succeeding in their goal and setting in motion something that will see the end of the Empire.

rogue-one-hi-res-15-214477

The Movie

Gareth Edwards made a Star Wars movie that feels completely different and yet utterly familiar, all at the same time. Like The Clone Wars, Edwards uses cinematic inspirations to pull in the war movie genre and make it a Star Wars movie, emphasis on the war. The nods to great war films of the past are all there and they work perfectly. On top of that you feel the “Star Wars” seeping out of every single frame. The Ghost from Star Wars Rebels can be seen at least 4 times, General Sydulla is called for over the coms at Yavin 4, the sets feel like they came out of a lost arc of The Clone Wars, Saw Gerrera has an important role and so much more. The point here is that Edwards lovingly knits together the history of the Prequel and the Original trilogy and it’s seamless.

Star Wars, when it’s at it’s best, is stretching what it means to be Star Wars by taking other genres and telling a story in the Star Wars universe that aligns with the themes of the saga. Edwards achievement is nothing short of incredible, the movie feels like the Maker’s fingerprints are all over it and it’s the highest compliment that could be paid to the movie.

rogue-one-a-star-wars-story-felicity-jones-5k-wallpapers-hd-wallpapers

The characters are outstanding. K-2so is the best new droid since R2 and Jyn, Cassian, Chirrut, Baze and Bhodi are all welcome additions to the Star Wars canon. Darth Vader’s scenes are chilling (and let’s stop here and just geek out completely that Vader’s castle is finally on screen!) and perfectly played, just enough to leave you wanting more.

The music by Giacchino feels like a welcome addition to the Star Wars franchise, it’s much like The Clone Wars music and only references familiar themes in snippets yet that’s a good thing. The movie needed it’s own identity and the themes he created feel familiar and distinct, perfectly matching the spirit of the movie.

I’ll get personal, this movie is everything I wanted a new Star Wars movie to be. Pushing the boundaries of what it means to be Star Wars while at the same time respecting the history and the franchise as a whole. Here’s to hoping the rumors of Edwards wanting to direct a Kenobi movie are true. Rogue One is rated 4.5 upside down Death Stars out of 5.

Side note, if you did not read the book Catalyst by James Luceno, I highly recommend it. It is the lead-in novel for the movie and it does a fantastic job of filling in everything you’d want to know about Krennic, the Ersos and the Death Star.