Book Reviews · Books · Star Wars · The Rise of Skywalker · Uncategorized

The Art of Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker – Review

iuIn December 2019, the final film in the Skywalker Saga hit theaters. Unlike the previous two films in the Sequel Trilogy, which saw the release of the “Art of” book on the same day as the film, the book for The Rise of Skywalker was delayed for almost three months. Thankfully the wait is over!

The “Art of” books for the Sequel Trilogy have taken the place of the “Making of” books common in the era of The PrequelsThe Force Awakens and The Last Jedi “Art of” books generally followed the development of the movie, through the art, in a chronological fashion. The Rise of Skywalker book starts off much like The Last Jedi edition did, giving us a look at the art from the previous film which was deemed too much of a spoiler to be released the same day the movie came out in theaters. The first section of the book is called “Return of the Last Jedi” which gives us the art for Luke Skywalker’s showdown with Kylo on Crait, the throne room battle, the mirror cave, Kylo’s memories of Luke’s attack and the Holdo maneuver.

However, after this first section, the book is organized in a less chronological format. Chapters include: “The Costume Department”, “The Props Department”, “The Creature and Droid Department”, “The Art, Set Decoration and Computer Graphics Departments” and “Industrial Light & Magic and Post Production”. This layout presents frustrations for the reader with its lack of cohesion with the text that illuminates the making of the movie from start to finish. The art and the timeline of the movie never seem in sync enough to give you the feeling you know how it all fits together. Although there are some great tidbits in the text that offer readers some idea of what the movie was like through Abrams and Terrio’s different iterations, this edition lacks the depth of the previous two books for the Sequel Trilogy.

With this book there are also a few things completely missing. There is absolutely nothing from Trevorrow’s time working on the movie no art or story ideas. The only mention, which doesn’t even refer to him by name, comes in the description of Abrams taking over the production in 2017. Exegol and Palpatine are other notable omissions. How this book can have nothing from one of the most significant portions of the movie is astounding. The addition of Palpatine to The Rise of Skywalker is legitimately the most important plot point in the whole film and the lack of any art or information on his return hurts the book.

The art itself is beautiful, as always, and the presentation of it in the quality of the printing is what one would expect. If you are a completist, this book will be a must. If you are not, this might not be something you’ll feel like you have to have. Where the novelization for The Rise of Skywalker added a great deal to the movie, the “Art of” left me wanting. The Art of Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker is rated 3 out 5 stars.

This review copy of  The Art of Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker was provided by Abrams Books.

This review originally appeared on The Star Wars Report.

Book Reviews · Books · Star Wars · The Rise of Skywalker · Uncategorized

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker: Expanded Edition – Review

9780593128404The Rise of Skywalker brought the Skywalker Saga to a close. If there was any criticism this reviewer had of the film, it was that the movie should have been longer, to allow scenes to breathe more, giving us more background, as well as more character moments. Thankfully Rae Carson’s expanded edition of the novelization is here to do just that!

Novels have some distinct advantages over movies and one of the biggest is allowing the readers to be inside the minds of the characters and understand what they are thinking in pivotal scenes. The Rise of Skywalker novelization is no exception. There are many key moments where Carson has been able to expound on an important point in the film through getting inside what a characters are thinking.

Much has been made of the ways the novel is able clarify or add to the understanding of certain revelations from the movie and they’ve not been exaggerated. Almost every expanded scene in the book should have been in the movie. Most of them would have added minutes, at most, to each scene, but what they do for the story is significant. Reading the book can be a frustrating experience because it will leave you scratching your head as to why so much of this was not included into the finished film. Some of these things can be read into the movie through what is given, but the explicitness the book gives to these scenes, honestly improves the story.

Rae Carson’s lead-in to Solo, Most Wanted was a great book and her work here lives up to that. She was able to perfectly expand on The Rise of Skywalker. The Revenge of the Sith is the gold standard of Star Wars novelizations, The Rise of Skywalker is the second. The way this book adds to the movie and expounds on it, makes the film better. It is rated 4.5 out of 5 stars.

This review originally appeared on The Star Wars Report.

Film · Movies · Star Wars · Star Wars Rebels · The Clone Wars · The Force Awakens · The Last Jedi · The Rise of Skywalker · Uncategorized

How ‘The Rise of Skywalker’ Helped Me Make Peace With the Sequel Trilogy: A Personal Journey

d0108c1956418882012 was a difficult year for me as a Star Wars fan. Disney bought Lucasfilm from George Lucas and the very first thing they did was cancel a show I was in love with. The Clone Wars had burst on to the big screen in 2008 and immediately captured my heart. The animation would get better as the series continued on the the small screen, but the heart of Star Wars was evident from the beginning. But with one swift stroke of its corporate might, Disney cut it down before The Clone Wars had a chance to properly wrap itself up.

In my mind this was the worst way Disney could introduce themselves as new owners of a franchise I’ve loved since I was 6. It was my birthday the first time I saw the Original Trilogy. We rented the Saga on VHS and my friends and I devoured all three films in one night. In the middle of the night I awoke, popped The Empire Strikes Back, back in the VCR and my journey toward being a fan was complete.

As 2014 rolled around, Disney released it’s first major addition to the Star Wars universe, Star Wars Rebels. I’ll admit that the first season was not it’s best. I had a hard time connecting with what felt like the Disney-ification of the Star Wars (Thankfully the series would grow and become of of my favorite things in the Saga). Which, as I looked towards the upcoming movie, The Force Awakens, didn’t engender a lot of hope.

star-wars-force-awakens-official-posterChristmas of 2015 arrives and so does the first film to continue the Skywalker Saga. There is an awakening of Star Wars mania, the likes that had not been seen since 1999. As the world revels in this new Episode, I struggle. I said then in my review,  “The movie is clearly more worried about appeasing fanboys than truly inspiring the next generation of fans.” I saw the movie 6 times, as I wrestled with how I felt about it and it just never settled for me. From the first viewing, to the last, I was never able to find my peace with the movie. Yet there was always hope, there were more movies to come in the new Trilogy and luckily there were also other Star Wars movies coming in-between Episodes VII and VIII.

The teaser trailer for Rogue One: A Star Wars Story came out in April of 2016 and my first reaction was not great. You can ask my friends, my first thought was, “This looks like Hunger Games in Star Wars.” I’ve never been so thankful to be proven wrong. Rogue One became one of my favorite Star Wars movies of all time. And in that, hope was kindled that Episode VIII would follow in its footsteps.

Celebration Orlando, 2017 was a difficult time for me. It was not the experience I hoped it would be. I missed out on all the exclusives I wanted as well as most of the panels I wanted to be in. The main hall was so small and because of that I would experience the Episode VIII trailer in the overflow room.  But something happened in that room, a small flame was lit, The Last Jedi looked different from The Force Awakens. It actually looked like it was going to do something new, something different! The teaser trailer made me hopeful that this new Episode would be better than VII. I believed that Rian Johnson’s indie background would be a benefit to the story by helping him do something to move the Saga from nostalgia to new territory.

I’ve never been so wrong in my life. VIII made VII look like a masterpiece to me. J.J. Abrams in a recent interview found a way to sum up my feelings perfectly when he told the New York Times, “On the other hand,” he added, “it’s a bit of a meta approach to the story. I don’t think that people go to ‘Star Wars’ to be told, ‘This doesn’t matter.’”

ILMVFX_2017-Oct-09The Last Jedi had taken all the story points from The Force Awakens and told us they were not important. Snoke – you don’t need to know about him. The mystery of who Rey is – not important. The villains like Hux that were so scary in the first movie – actually they are incompetent boobs. Luke Skywalker – not the hero you thought, actually he’s a failure who seems to have learned nothing from his experiences in The Empire Strikes Back and more importantly, The Return of the Jedi. I was devastated. My first viewing’s feelings were only confirmed with each new viewing.

Now, some of these issues were not just the problem of the filmmakers, but they’d started behind the scenes from the moment Disney bought the franchise. They had fast-tracked Episode VII but had never sat down and mapped out where they wanted this new trilogy to go. They had been given outlines from George Lucas but decided that they wanted to move in their own direction. The problem was, they didn’t really know what that direction was, (this is also exemplified in the problems they had with other Star Wars projects and the difficulty of hanging on to directors) other than wanting to recapture the “magic” of the Original Trilogy. There was no consistent creative vision behind the new movies and that became evident with The Last Jedi. With everyone trying to do their own thing, the new trilogy lacked cohesion, leaving Episode IX with the massive task of not only wrapping up this trilogy but the Saga as a whole.

In 2018, Solo: A Star Wars Story was released in theaters. It’s path had been anything but easy. It’s original directors had been fired mid-way through filming, with Ron Howard replacing them. Tasked with bringing the movie in on time, since Bob Iger refused to movie the release date, even though Kathleen Kennedy had asked, Howard pulled off a miracle. Solo was a fantastic movie, but it was not a success. Released a few short months after the divisive Episode VIII, Solo suffered. There was no marketing for the movie, not the kind we’ve come to expect for a Star Wars movie and because of the money that had been spent on extensive reshoots, Solo would be seen as a failure.

RegalMovies_2018-Apr-08Regardless of its “failure” status, Solo was a home run for me. From the moment the movie began, I had a smile on my face that never left. Not only was the movie fun, but it felt like Star Wars. It also did something that I did not think possible, it gave us new things, while at the same time respecting the past. I fell in love with Alden Ehrenreich as Han, yet more importantly, I also fell for the new characters. Qi’ra and Enfys Nest were awesome. The addition of Crimson Dawn to the underworld and the reveal of its leader, left me wanting more of this story. But it also gave me hope. The use of Maul seemed to indicate that the Star Wars films might start to embrace the larger universe as well as reward fans for their loyalty to all Star Wars had to offer. (I’m still hoping Disney will #MakeSolo2Happen)

All of this preamble, to arrive at The Rise of Skywalker. J.J. Abrams was tasked with the impossible, bring the Skywalker Saga to a satisfactory end. He’d not planned on returning, but with the loss of Colin Trevorrow, who was never able to satisfy Lucasfilm with his story ideas, Abrams became the last hope. Abrams had always hinted that he’d had ideas for where he would take the story if he had continued it. The Force Awakens itself was proof that he did, the questions the movie had asked were still waiting to be answered and now he’d been given his shot. He explained his approach well in Vanity Fair, “It felt slightly more renegade; it felt slightly more like, you know, F*%$ it, I’m going to do the thing that feels right because it does, not because it adheres to something.”

With all of the upheaval from 2012 to December 2019, I sat in the theater with absolute trepidation. Would this movie work? Would I like it or would it be another Last Jedi? To my utter surprise, I liked it, from start to finish. It did something I never expected it to be able to, it not only made me like The Force Awakens more, it actually utilized plot elements from The Last Jedi in a way that almost redeemed them in my eyes. It also found a way to bring the Skywalker Saga to a satisfactory close for me.

This last point was the one I had been the most worried about. The story for the Skywalkers seemed to have had the perfect end in The Return of the Jedi, so how could this add anything to that without ruining it?

Abrams and his writing partner, Chris Terrio found their answer in the idea of the Dyad. Rey and Ben Solo being the two that are one really resonates with the rest of the Star Wars canon. It brings to mind the Mortis Arc from The Clone Wars, the daughter and son, as well as the mural on the floor of the first Jedi Temple on Ahch-To, of Jedi Prime. It also made sense in my mind with the prophesy of the Chosen One.

Anakin was the prophesied “Chosen One”, Lucas himself had confirmed that. But was he able to fully complete the mission? I found my in. I contend that his rejection of the call on Mortis and his betrayal of the Jedi allow his sacrifice to bring balance to the Force, but not lasting balance. Now, we know that Anakin was a vergence in the Force, created by the Force itself. Whether Palpatine had anything to do with this is still a question, but we know Palpatine had a child of his own. These two powerful families in the Force destinies became intertwined.

Now without the sacrifice of the Chosen One, all would have been lost, but with his act he enables the Force to continue its work. George Lucas said of Star Wars,

Star Wars has always struck a cord with people. There are issues of loyalty, of friendship, of good and evil…I mean, there’s a reason this film is so popular. It’s not that I’m giving out propaganda nobody wants to hear…Knowing that the film was made for a younger audience, I was trying to say, in a simple way, that there is a God and that there is both a good and bad side. You have a choice between them, but the world works much better if you’re on the good side.”

Choices in Star Wars have always mattered. The choice between a selfish life and that of selflessness are at the core. Anakin’s selfless act at the end of his life continues the thread of the Jedi. That thread of selflessness runs through his son Luke, his daughter Leia and through the son of Palpatine as well. Both sides of the Dyad are drenched in selflessness and compassion. In fact, they are the very thing that the Jedi lost sight of by the time of the Republic’s end, unconditional love. Fear seems to have lead the Jedi to ban attachment. Attachment can lead to jealousy and greed, but it doesn’t have to. Anakin, Luke, Leia, Palpatine’s son, they all show the importance and triumph of unconditional, sacrificial love.

the-art-of-star-wars-the-rise-of-skywalker-kylo-renThe Sith longed to find the way to everlasting life, yet they were always doomed to fail because of their selfishness. The only way to save someone from death is to give up one’s own life. There is always a cost to one’s self to save someone or something else. Rey shows that when she heals the snake, Leia shows that when she uses the last of her life to bring her son back from the dark and Ben does so when he brings Rey back from the brink of death. There is a real beauty to the fact that Ben does the very thing Anakin desired in his fall, bring back the one he loved from the dead. Rey and Ben become one, the light and the dark together, fulfilling the call of the Chosen One to fully bring balance to the Force. Ben finishes what his grandfather began and again, sacrificial love wins.

This was my in. This is the way The Rise of Skywalker helped me find peace with the Sequel Trilogy, because of the way, I feel, it honors what came before, but also adds something new. It stays true to the most important theme of the Star Wars saga and the thing Lucas instilled in it from the beginning, a life of selflessness is better than a life of selfishness. Abrams and Terrio were able to use the questions raised in The Force Awakens and plot points from The Last Jedi to create something that left me satisfied and for that I’ll forever be a grateful fan.

Film · Movie Review · Movies · Podcasts · Star Wars · The Rise of Skywalker · Uncategorized

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker – Review

I have thought about writing a written review for this, but there is so much to talk about that I am not sure I would do it the justice I have on the podcasts I’ve recorded. I may still sit down and write something, possibly a series, focused on key areas, but until then, please enjoy my thoughts on Aggressive Negotiations and The 602 Club!

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Issue 192: Skywalker Risen.

A long time have they waited…and you have too. It’s the inevitable reaction show to Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker from the Jedi Masters themselves.

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The 602 Club 263: The Power of Sacrifice

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker.

The wait is over, the final film in the Skywalker saga is here, again (for those that are old enough to remember the last time it was here with Revenge of the Sith) and JJ Abrams is back to wrap up this Sequel Trilogy that he began in 2015 with The Force Awakens.

In this episode of The 602 Club hosts Matthew Rushing and Christy Morris welcome Bruce Gibson to talk about Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker. We discuss leaving the theater, Rey’s answers, the Dyad, Bendemption, confronting fear, the rise of Palpatine…again, new and old characters, the Sith, The First Order, The Final Order, too many reversals, old friends return, the final score and our ratings.