Tag Archives: Solo

Industrial Light & Magic Presents: Making Solo: A Star Wars Story – Review

71FyiYhJsjLThis review originally appeared on The Star Wars Report.

I unabashedly love Solo: A Star Wars Story, so when I heard that there was going to be a “making of” book about it, I was excited. Not only would this offer a look behind the scenes, but it also had the added draw of being authored by Industrial Light & Magic’s own Rob Bredow who had been the VFX supervisor on the film. The idea for this book came to Bredow as he was on set, taking photos for reference and realizing that he was the only one around with a camera. 23,953 photos later and with Kathleen Kennedy’s seal of approval, Industrial Light & Magic Presents: Making Solo: A Star Wars Story was born.

There have been a lot of “making of” books for Star Wars movies, but none have ever felt this intimate. Bredow’s photos are as behind the scenes as it gets, raw and completely in the moment. He captures the essence of what it is like to be on set from pre production to post, making you feel as though you are actually there. Because of his experience working in VFX, the book helps show the relationship this production had between the SFX on set and their partner VFX. Bredow not only breaks down the images he shares but also interviews different people from the production about their part in the movie. His daughter’s interview with DP Bradford Young for a school project stands out as one of the best exchanges and illustrates how Star Wars truly is a family affair, even for those behind the camera.

This book is about being behind the scenes and therefore does give fans a clearer idea of some of the things Lord and Miller were responsible for shooting and where Ron Howard was able to put his stamp on the film. Reading the book will leave you with a whole new appreciation for just how much Ron Howard took on when he agreed to finish Solo. To quote a famous Star Wars character, it was impressive, most impressive.

Industrial Light & Magic Presents: Making Solo: A Star Wars Story is a book best experienced. They say a picture is worth a thousand words and Bredow’s book proves that axiom to be true. If you want a truly immersive look behind the scenes of a Star Wars movie, this is the book for you. This is the kind of book we need more of in fandom, so I encourage you to pick up a copy and support it so we can get more like it in the future. I give this 4.5 out of 5 stars.

Advertisements

Solo: A Star Wars Story Novelization – Revew

solo-novel-cover

This review was originally seen on The Star Wars Report.

It’s been a good year for Star Wars books. Most Wanted, Thrawn: Alliances, and The Mighty Chewbacca and the Forest of Fear are just a few examples of the good stories that have been released. This month Del Rey released the novelization of Solo and, like they did with The Last Jedi, it’s an “Expanded Edition.” An “Expanded Edition” means it contains deleted scenes incorporated back into the story, as well as extensions to existing material seen in the film. This tactic worked well for The Last Jedi, whose novelization was better than its source material.

So the question is, does it work again with Solo? Thankfully the answer is a resounding yes!

Murr Lafferty has seamlessly integrated the new material with what was seen in the movie to create something truly special. She masterfully takes what was there and accentuates everything you wanted to know more about while watching the film. Han, Qi’ra, Beckett, Chewie, L3, Enfys Nest, and almost every other character in the film benefit from added time spent with them, as well as the added bonus of being privy to their thoughts. It cannot be overstated just how much fun it is to be back in this story with new material that adds to the depth and richness of the Solo part of the Star Wars galaxy.

The rest of this review could spend the next few paragraphs laying out all the additions the novelization has, but there would be no fun in that. Part of the joy of reading this book is the delight in not knowing exactly what has been expanded. The highest praise this book could be given is how deftly it shows the fertile playground the underworld is in the Star Wars universe. It’ll leave readers longing to watch Solo again and to see more Solo films that continue the story. Solo is a must read and is rated 4.75 out of 5 stars.

This review was completed using a copy of Solo: A Star Wars Story provided by Del Rey.

The Mighty Chewbacca in the Forest of Fear – Review

The_Mighty_Chewbacca_Forest_of_FearThis post originally appeared on The Star Wars Report.

Disney Press continues it’s streak of excellent tie-in work for Star Wars with The Mighty Chewbacca in the Forest of Fear. The book is written by Origami Yoda author Tom Angleberger, who brings his humor and wit to bear on a story from Chewie’s perspective. When Han finds himself double crossed, it’s up to Chewie, a librarian named Mayv and undercover droid K-2SO to save the day. To spoil it, right up front, the book is a joy to read.

Wookiee Depth

There are not many books that tell a story from Chewbacca’s point of view, so immediately Angleberger’s book stands out. To get past the language barrier, the book is told by a narrator. In some ways, the narrator felt a bit like Ron Howard’s narration in Arrested Development, which fits perfectly. The beauty of the book is the way it capitalizes on Solo: A Star Wars Story‘s presentation of Chewie and runs with it.

Chewie, who’s long been relegated to sidekick status in the films, is given room to shine here. Angleberger brings real depth to the character which is accentuated through his relationship with Mayv. They both get to share their stories with one another (Mayv only partially understands Chewie’s since she’s not well versed in Shyriiwook, luckily the narrator is) which brings them closer, realizing that the Empire has had the same impact on both of their lives. What’s neat about this is how it’s just one more example of the Empire’s tightening grip on the galaxy as it destroys freedom and creates a totalitarian, thought-police state.

On top of all of this, the mission that Chewie, K2 and Mayv are on, is one that ties in nicely with some things we’ve seen in other places. The person holding Han hostage, sends them to a planet to retrieve a book that the Emperor wants. There is a very familiar green mist on this planet, reminiscent to Dathomir Magic, which does leave a strong impression that they may be linked somehow. Plus, having Palpatine looking for more Dark Side relics connects nicely with Marvel‘s first Lando comic and his ship full of Sith artifacts.

Conclusion

Like Guardians of the WhillsThe Mighty Chewbacca in the Forest of Fear is a fantastic Star Wars read. From start to finish it’s fun, well written and seriously, it brings out the joy of being a fan. The Mighty Chewbacca is rated 5 out of 5 Wookiee growls!

The Hutt Gambit – Review

The_Hutt_Gambit_coverMy look back at A.C. Crispin’s Han Solo trilogy continues with the second book in the series, The Hutt Gambit. I was pleasantly surprised that this was a better book than the first. The writing was better and I just personally found the story line a more engaging.

The book starts off with Han already having been kicked out of the Imperial Academy. I found this frustrating because I was hoping that Crispin would delve into his time there, it seems like something that gets glossed over too easily. The other annoying thing, and Crispin makes a habit of doing this in the series, is telling important parts of Han’s story in flashback. What I don’t like about it, is that it feels unnecessary, especially when the flashback is the meeting between Han and Chewie and Han’s rescue of him, which is the cause of his dishonorable discharg. The meeting of these two icons deserves more than a flashback. I wish the book had started with Han, in the Academy and then let his meet-cute with Chewie be the focus of the first few chapters.

This book also introduces Boba Fett and Lando into Han’s life. I felt like Crispin does a great job of creating enmity between Han and Fett so that you believe there is true hostility between the characters. Lando on the other hand, just came out of nowhere and his reason for looking for Han just didn’t seem to fit the character, he’s wanting piloting lessons. Couple this with Chewie needing to be taught by Han how to fly, it just makes everyone a little too dependent on the “GREAT HAN SOLO”.

There are a few other minor things that bugged me about the book. One is that Han is a little too good at leadership and willing to fight for a cause here. I would have much rather seen him have to learn these things throughout this entire series than see him pretty much be the guy that could transition into Rebel general at a moments notice. Lastly, the way they fool the Empire (and I won’t give it away here) felt straight out of Star Trek not Star Wars. Lastly, there is a bit of this book in the middle that drags and it definitely has the middle book syndrome because some major plot elements are left dangling for book three.

Where this book excels is in the world building. Crispin creates such a vibrant smuggler community. Her descriptions of Smuggler’s Run and the Kessel Run are excellent. She also gives us a lot of insight into the Hutt cartel. I found myself using The Clone Wars hutts and their looks as stand-ins for her hutt meetings. Crispin is also able to make what Daley did with the Corporate Sector work well in this version of the Star Wars galaxy. It’s not just the Empire that’s a worry or of interest here, there are a lot of neat factions and she brings the seedy underbelly of the galaxy to life.

I feel like The Hutt Gambit is an improvement over the first book, leaving me excited to finish the series. I rate it 3 1/2 out of 5 stars.

Most Wanted – Review

SOLO - A Star Wars Story MOST WANTED Cover Ultra Hi ResolutionThis review was originally published on The Star Wars Report. Also don’t miss The 602 Club review!

One of the best things about a new Star Wars film are the books that come out in support of them and Solo: A Star Wars Story is no exception. Last Shot by Daniel José Older was a wonderful companion to the movie, giving depth to both Han and Lando around the time of Solo but also featured them after Return of the Jedi. Fans would be doing themselves a disservice if they neglected the YA novels that have been released as tie-ins to the movies. Lost Stars is considered one of the best of the new canon and Rebel Rising added tremendous depth to Jyn in Rogue One. With that in mind, Most Wanted looks to do the same thing for Solo by giving us the backstory to how Han and Qi’ra become the team we see in the film.

Character Work

The joy of these books is when they help flesh out the characters, giving us insight as to who they are and who they will become. Rae Carson nails the characterization of Han and Qi’ra perfectly. She is able to use the plot of the book to not only get them to where we see them in the film but to explain who they are at the core. It’s fascinating to see what attracts Han and Qi’ra to each other and not so much romantically, but as people. Carson is able to show though her story the reason these two people gravitate towards each other and make such a good team. She’s also able to show the complexity of their relationship and why they’ll continue to care so much about each other, even when taking different paths in the end. The nuances here are what stand out and Carson brings those to life beautifully.

What Will Save You

The biggest strengths in the book is Carson’s ability to sow the seeds of incongruity between Han and Qi’ra’s worldview. For Han life is, “…having one person in all the galaxy to fly with. Someone you can trust to have your back”. His experiences in Most Wanted galvanize this idea for him, whereas for Qi’ra, even though she sees the benefit of this kind of thinking, she cannot fully commit to it. She senses that it’s power and money that will give her the freedom she so desperately deserves, because in the end, everyone will betray you. What’s so good about this, is again, it’s nuanced, it’s not clear cut, especially when it comes to Qi’ra.

The Book

The bar for these books has been set very high with stories like Lost Stars and Rebel Rising and thankfully, Most Wanted lives up! Carson’s world building on Corellia is excellent. She adds to the understanding of the White Worms gang, Qi’ra’s background with The Silos, other crime syndicates on Corellia and the idea of droid freedom from Solo. What makes this book so good is the way it adds to the film and expands the experience through deepening the understanding of the characters and the life they had before the film. Most Wanted is highly recommended and rated 4 and a 1/2 stars out of 5.

Don’t miss The 602 Club Podcast and Cinema Stories Podcast reviews of Solo!

The Paradise Snare – Review

The_Paradise_Snare_coverIn light of Solo: A Star Wars Story I thought it would be fun to go back to the Legends line and read some of the books that deal with the character’s origin and his homeward. Having recently read Brian Daley’s trilogy for Aggressive Negotiations, A.C. Crispin’s trilogy felt like the right place to begin.

What is really fascinating is reading this book post-Solo. There are some things here that feel very familiar. Han’s life on Corellia has a lot of similarities to the movie and I feel like it’s well done here in the book. It does a good job of beginning to show us why Han is so “solo”. I will say him having a wookiee raise him was a bit on the nose. I was also a little disappointed to find out that Solo was not an orphan but related to a well-to-do family on Corellia.

The Paradise Snare is a mixed bag for me. The Han we get in this story seemed a bit too much like the one we know from A New Hope and therefore his arc to becoming the man who will live up to his last name does not seem as pronounced as I’d like it to be. On the other side, seeing the way he gets to the Imperial Academy was great. Far from the Empire being seen as the bad guys, it was neat to see how people think of the Academy and being part of the Empire is a good thing at this point in time. This point of view, in light of the end of Revenge of the Sith, still works well.

The part of the book I like the best is the way it shows us the galaxy outside the Rebellion/Imperial conflict. Seeing the cartels like the Hutts, the spice trade and the seedier parts of Star Wars opens up so many story-telling opportunities. It also uses Daley’s ideas about the Corporate Authority in that, these crime syndicates are another major faction in what is happening between the Prequels and Originals.

The goal of these reviews will not be spoilers or to get into every single detail, but more to give an overview of my impressions looking back on something with all the knowledge of canon. The fun thing for me is I’ve not read these books and it’s enjoyable to see just how much of what is canon now references works such as this. I’d rate the The Paradise Snare 3 1/2 out 5 stars. Worth going back and reading.

Solo: A Star Wars Story – Review

solo-star-wars-story-imax-poster-1108152Don’t miss The 602 Club and Cinema Stories reviews!

When the fateful sale of Lucasfilm happened and Disney snatched up one of the most beloved franchises, they promised us not just more Episodes, but stand alone films as well. Some of the first ideas they had were what became Rogue One but also names like Solo, Fett and Kenobi began to emerge as ideas for films. Now, let me be honest, the idea of a Solo or Fett movie did nothing for me, in fact I was pretty hostile to it. I just couldn’t see the need for them. Then of course there was the behind-the-scenes drama with the directors getting fired, Ron Howard stepping in and the rumors that 70% of the movie was being reshot. Not the best marketing tool. Then, slowly, the trailers began to appear and something inside me began to warm to the idea and beyond all reason, the film began to grow on me. Now that Solo has opened, I’ve seen it, so let’s dive in, shall we.

Everyone Serves Someone 

One of the most interesting aspects of Solo is Qi’ra’s comment that, “Everyone serves someone” and the way the movie plays that out. From the Dickensian existence of orphans on Corellia, to droids in a death match cage, to wealthy gangsters like Dryden, to an entire galaxy under the heal of the Emperor, everyone is serving someone. The question of the film becomes, “Who will you serve then, and why?”.

Inside Han there is this rebellious spirit that longs to be free, free from the rules placed on him by other people, he’s bound to no one but who he’s chosen, Qi’ra. She is his only love, the one thing he values more than his own life. Han has this instinctual, self-sacrificial love for Qi’ra that will lead him on his goal of freeing her when it’s only he that is able to escape the hell of Corellia.

What makes this fascinating is that Han can never truly escape this innate sense of right/wrong and love for the downtrodden. In a universe where everyone seems to just be trying to survive, Han, because of his early experience with sacrificial love not only wants to survive, but also help others do the same. He does so with Chewie, Qi’ra and others he meets along the way. He can’t seem to help himself. What is nice is that this doesn’t make Han a fool, he doesn’t completely trust anyone, yet he does want to believe that everyone can choose the “right” path. In the end, Han chooses to serve no one but those he cares about. He cares about himself, Chewie and there’s a spark of the “good guy” in him that he just can’t get rid of. The beauty of it all is that Han’s rebellion is being a character that loves other people and is not just selfishly out for himself, he hopes for better. Oh he’ll wear the facade of a swaggering smuggler, but deep down, he’ll find his true calling one day and the film sets up this wonderfully.

The Movie

HSLostLegacy_artThe true strength of Solo is the way it uses the Star Wars lore. This movie has lovingly crafted a story that pays homage to the Prequels, The Clone Wars, Rebels, Rogue One and the Original Trilogy to perfection, all while adding to it in fun and unique ways. There are designs that are reminiscent of things seen in The Clone Wars, story points and even musical cues that all connect back, but they also forge their own path. Honestly, this is how you add to the Star Wars universe. There has been such care taken here to understand the time period they are in, what has come before and how they can link to it, but also build upon it in a way that feels fresh and familiar all at the same time. There are so many examples I could give but they would ruin surprises, so one small easter egg, just to prove my point. In Dryden’s office, you will see the skull from the cover of Brian Daley’s third Solo adventure novel, Han Solo and the Lost Legacy! It is details like these and so many others that make this movie something special.

Ron Howard was clearly the person to direct this movie. You can see the Lucasian influence everywhere and much like The Clone Wars series, this film takes what we know of Star Wars and then infuses it with new genres like the western, mob movies and a bit of noir to create it’s own feel but something that is undeniably Star Wars. Howard gets this universe and he’s greatly helped by a scrip from the Kasdans that also knows the whole saga, inside and out.

When the movie was first announced, one of the biggest question marks was Alden Ehrenreich, could he inhabit Han and bring him to life in Harrison Ford’s shadow? I’m here to tell you, he nails it. Alden is perfect as the young Solo. From the beginning of the film I never once questioned him as the character, he filled the pilot’s seat with ease. There was never a question in my mind that Donald Glover would be a great Lando and I was right. I enjoyed Emilia Clarke’s Qi’ra, she’s a good character and by the end, I’m left wanting to know what happens next. In truth, the cast was brilliant and they each breathe life into these character in a way that’s real, fun and engaging, making me want another Solo film (something I never thought I would hear myself say).

Conclusion

There is so much more I could say about this movie. What I’m left with is just how much fun I had. I left the theater buzzing and wearing the same goofy grin as Solo himself. Do yourself a favor, grab some friends and go see this movie! This movie is everything Star Wars fans never knew, they always wanted! I rate Solo, 4 out 5 trips through the Maw! HanSolo5a7e076419ab9.0

Make sure to check out The 602 Club review of the Star Wars tie-in novel Last Shot which is so worth reading!