Tag Archives: Movie Review

Justice League – Review

justice-league-hidden-superman-poster-1040714Listen to The 602 Club review here!

In 2013 Zack Snyder, DC Comics and Warner Brothers started a journey to bring the characters of the comics to screen in a way they had not been seen before. Backed by Christopher Nolan as an executive producer, they began with Man of Steel. Superman’s origin was retold for the first time since 1978, asking the question, “What would it actually be like to actually have this being on our world?”. The saga continued with Batman v Superman, introducing us to a Batman on the edge becoming the villain and an appearance by the enigma known as Wonder Woman. In the end they save the world but lose one of their own. Although Snyder did not direct Wonder Woman, he helped write the story which bookends in the present, to tie into the culmination of all this set up in Justice League.

The Story

The plot of the movie is simple, after the death of Superman, Mother Boxes leftover from a failed invasion by Steppenwolf begin ringing. They sound that the earth is vulnerable and it’s time for Steppenwolf to return to finish what he started. Bruce Wayne has run into the Parademons, scouts for the invasion to come and begins actively recruiting the meta-humans revealed in Batman v Superman to stop what is coming.

Light Shines in the Darkness (Spoilers)

There is a real beauty to the simplicity of the story and it’s themes. Each one of these characters is hiding in some way. Diana’s always been there for the world when it needed her, but she shut herself off from being that inspiration, light and from true human connection after the loss of Steve. Victor Stone (Cyborg) feels lost in the ones and zeros he is now constantly bombarded with since one of the Mother Boxes gave him the ability to be forever connected to all things digital. Barry Allen is socially awkward, living and working with only one goal, to find a way to prove is father innocent of his mother’s murder. Arthur Curry embraces neither the sea or the land, unsure of who he is and still stinging from the perceived abandonment of his mother.

Lastly there is Bruce. He’s hidden so long behind the pain of his parents death, it’s made him, in his own words, less human. He’s hid behind the cowl, which almost completely consumed him. It took Clark to show him the way. Superman’s sacrifice awakens something in Bruce and he begins to slowly reflect the light that Clark had shone so brightly, to others. He shines that light on Arthur and Barry who join the team. He challenges Diana to remember who she is and what she was meant to be and in turn she’s able to nurture that light in Victor.

Coming together, the realize they are not enough. They work to bring Superman back to life with the help of a Mother Box, knowing that he’s truly the world’s only hope. Clark does not take well to being brought back to life until Lois shows up. It’s a touching scene as he’s flown them back to the farm, and they talk in the dawn’s early light. Hope and light are back and in the end he returns to help the team save earth. What makes this so poignant is that it feels like the fulfillment of Jor-El’s prophecy to Clark all the way back in Man of Steel,

You will give the people of Earth an ideal to strive towards. They will race behind you, they will stumble, they will fall. But in time, they will join you in the sun, Kal. In time, you will help them accomplish wonders.

The world we live in has been darker of late. Justice League reminds us that it is only together that we can dive back the darkness. Not through the lock-step unity that Steppenwolf would bring, but through the individual gifts that we’ve been given, working in harmony with one another for the greater good, the sacrificial good.

Characters

This is the best thing about the film. Each one of these characters comes off the screen kind of perfectly. Ezra Miller as Flash distinguishes himself nicely from the one on television. He’s young, inexperience and unsure of his abilities. Cyborg played by Ray Fisher is understated and yet it’s perfect for the role. He’s a young man struggling to find the gift in the tragedy that’s befallen him. Jason Momoa is excellent as the guff man of the ocean who’s just trying to find some meaning in life.

Ben Affleck’s Batman has grown tremendously since Batman v Superman, making good on his promise to not fail Clark in death. Affleck portrays the older Batman trying to learn how to play well with others perfectly. Gal Gadot, what more can be said about how good she is as Wonder Woman? She play’s the progression from who she is at the end of Batman v Superman and in light of the revelations of Wonder Woman so well. Henry Cavill as Superman is a vision. Superman has arrived in all the glory that we’ve been waiting to see from the beginning of Man of Steel. His arc has brought him fully to becoming the icon of truth and justice we all love. Each one of these characters make me want more of each of them. You’re left longing for each of them to be given their next solo outing as well as their next team mission.

The Movie

This movie is by no means perfect. It does feel rushed at only 2 hours. There is a lot happening and it does seem like a bit more time with the stories of the villain, Victor, Barry and Arthur could have helped the audience connect even more with the story. The villain is one note, but it does leave us with more time to focus on the heroes and their journeys to becoming a team. There are places where you wish the effects team had more time with the CGI to refine it and make it better. The best comparison that I can make would be the DC animated films that have come out over the last few years or some of your favorite episodes of Justice League United, if you liked those, you’ll like this. Overall, what wins you over is the team, their dynamic and the charisma they bring to each moment. Justice League is rated 4 out of 5 resurrections.

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A Maligned Movie

tsc-153-th-square-1440In the past 20 years there have been a few movies that have been completely lambasted by fans to the point of almost absurdity. One of them was The Phantom Menace (let’s be honest the entire Prequel Trilogy has been treated this way, Revenge of the Sith to a lesser extent than the first two). No film has received more ridicule and hate than The Phantom Menace….. but is that true? I think there is one that has eclipsed the first Prequel and it’s none other than Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. With this reputation in mind, John Mills and I put this film to the test in the latest episode in The 602 Club. We talk though the whole movie, trying to hit as many points as possible and you might just be surprised where we end. Give it a listen and tell us what you think!

 

War for the Planet of the Apes – Review

war-for-planet-of-the-apes-poster-5Don’t miss The 602 Club episode on the film.

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I’ll admit, in 2011 when Rise of the Planet of the Apes was released, I was a sceptic. Honestly, the trailers did nothing for me, leaving me unimpressed and unmotivated to see the movie in the theater. So I didn’t. I ended up seeing the movie on a whim with some friends, at home, because we had heard so many people raving about it. It won us all over, so much so that after it was over we turned on the original Planet of the Apes because we were so enthused by what we had just seen. Fast forward to 2017 and the last film in the trilogy has been released, War for the Planet of the Apes, completing the saga and leaving me with the same desire, to watch the original to connect the dots.

Mercy

The movie begins with humans attacking an ape base. The apes are able to repel the invaders and Caesar sends four captives back to the human colonel as a peace offering. His message is simple, allow us the woods and the fighting can end. Sadly, there is no mercy in the Colonel, played by Woody Harrelson, only hate and hubris. The Colonel cannot let the apes live, cannot show mercy. He’s driven by fear, fear of the virus, apes and even himself.

There is a moment between Caesar and the Colonel when Caesar has been captured and the Colonel explains his rationale for what he’s doing. Humanity has begun changing again. The Simian flu virus has begun to evolve and it’s leaving humans unable to speak. It’s unclear whether it’s truly affecting their reasoning as well, but the Colonel has no mercy on them, even his own son. He willingly sacrifices his own son and anyone else that is caught with this virus to try to protect the rest of humanity. He speaks of learning from history but his actions shows he clearly hasn’t, as his first reaction with these humans as well as the apes is to just kill what he is afraid of or doesn’t understand.

Caesar finds himself mirroring the Colonel and Koba (from the previous 2 films). As man and specifically the Colonel, continue to take more and more from him, he finds it harder to let go of his own hate and show forgiveness and mercy. Yet, there is a moment in the film, where he’s faced with a similar situation as the Colonel, does he leave his son to die to save the rest of the apes, or does he find another way? He chooses the love of his son and all the other ape children over the “smarter” call. Caesar embodies the idea that the right thing is the right thing to do, even if it’s the hardest thing.

Even after all this, Caesar cannot let go of his hate for the Colonel, so with all his people making their way to safety, he seeks revenge, one last time. What he finds is poetic justice, the Colonel has succumb to the enhanced virus. It takes all Caesar’s will and mercy to not pull the trigger and just walk away. It’s a powerful moment. Caesar let’s go of his hate and thirst for vengeance. It brings to mind Deuteronomy where the Lord says, “Vengeance is Mine, and retribution…”. Here the vengeance is swift and sure, as man’s hubris and god-playing are rewarded with a destructive avalanche and a virus, robbing them of their faculties.

The Unwanted  

war-planet-of-apes-novaOne of the most beautiful messages of the film comes from the mute girl Nova, that Maurice adopts after the apes kill her caretaker that has tried to kill them. This unwanted girl has the updated Simian virus and Caesar would leave her to die (as would the Colonel), yet Maurice shows compassion and love for her. Yes, she is mute, but just because she cannot speak, does not mean she has no value. So many children are lost today because they are unwanted or their parents are told they will be born with a debilitating disease. Nova, because of Maurice’s mercy turns out to be instrumental in saving not just Caesar but the rest of the apes. She might not be able to speak, but her mind is still sharp allowing her to learning sign language from the apes. All humans, born and unborn, sick, infirm or strong and viral, have dignity and the right to life. As with Nova, who might they turn out to be if given the chance to live?

For you formed my inward parts; you knitted me together in my mother’s womb. I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are your works; my soul knows it very well. My frame was not hidden from you, when I was being made in secret, intricately woven in the depths of the earth. Your eyes saw my unformed substance; in your book were written, every one of them, the days that were formed for me, when as yet there was none of them. Psalm 139:13-16

The unwanted, the unloved, the accident, the sick, they are all made the same, in the image of God and who have we lost, simply because they were unwanted?

It is also a powerful reminder of our relationship in relation to God. As the Apostle Paul puts in the Book of Romans,

For while we were still weak, at the right time Christ died for the ungodly. For one will scarcely die for a righteous person—though perhaps for a good person one would dare even to die— but God shows his love for us in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. Since, therefore, we have now been justified by his blood, much more shall we be saved by him from the wrath of God. For if while we were enemies we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, now that we are reconciled, shall we be saved by his life. More than that, we also rejoice in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have now received reconciliation.

We were once enemies of God, yet he shows us mercy and grace, that in our most rebellious and unloveable, he offers forgiveness and reconciliation. A reflection of our closeness to God is our reaction to the most unwanted. Our capacity for mercy, increases as our understanding of our need for it from God expands. For God, no one is unwanted.

For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him. john 3:16 & 17

The Movie

This movie has so many other themes I could talk about, but honestly, just go see it. It’s a triumph of filmmaking. The effects are some of the best ever seen on screen. There was never a moment I didn’t believe what was happening. The music was moving and perfectly matched to the film. War for the Planet of the Apes is the perfect conclusion to one of the best film trilogies in years. It’s rated 5 out of 5 Bad Apes.

Wonder Woman – Review

C-38A4SXkAAVYkz.jpg-largeThis review does contain Spoilers. Listen to The 602 Club episode as well!

For over 75 years, Wonder Woman has thrilled fans in spectacular fashion, through comics, television shows and cartoons. Yet there was one place were she had still not broken though, the big screen. In 2016 she joined the rest of the DC Comics trinity, Batman and Superman in Zack Snyder’s Batman v Superman, teasing her history in the world and setting up her first solo film.

Story

Diana of Themyscira grows up under the watchful protection of her mother Hippolyta who’s one goal is to keep her daughter safe. To do so, she forbids her daughter from learning how to fight, as well as keeping from her, her true lineage. Diana was not sculpted out of clay and bought to life by Zeus, she is actually a living weapon that Hippolyta and Zeus came together to create as a last defense against Ares, if he should ever return.

Diana and General Antiope (Hippolyta’s sister) have different ideas, they secretly begin Diana’s training and when Hippolyta finds out, Antiope is finally able to convince her sister that it’s the right thing to do. It turns out to be a wise decision as WWI and Steve Trevor accidentally stumble upon Themyscira, leading Diana to embrace who she is to stop Ares once and for all.

Responsibility

Hippolyta does not want her daughter to leave Themyscira. For one thing, if she does, she can never return and secondly, she’s worried about her safety. She asks her daughter not to go, to which Diana replies, “Who will I be if I stay?”.  It may be the seminole question of our day; “Who are we if we shirk our responsibility in the face of evil?”. Diana must make the decision on what kind of person she wants to be. Steve Trevor helps her see the two options in a conversation they have. He tells her that his dad always said their are two options for anyone, do nothing or do something. He says he’s already tried doing nothing and that’s clearly not the answer.

Edmund Burke said, “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.” What evils are perpetrated while men and women sit on the sidelines? The most innocent and helpless among us suffer and die while we stick our heads in the social media sand, pretending our outrage helps, when in reality it’s meaningless. Diana and Steve stand against that, they will fight and die for what they know is right, even if no one else around them will.

wonder-woman-embargo-lift-image-full-236508A Time to Fight, A Time to Love

Diana and Steve are able to bring a notebook he stole from one of the villains, Doctor Isabel Maru (Doctor Poison), back to the British, who he is working with. Even though the book clearly lays out the plans for an unstoppable gas, that could kill millions, the men in charge insist that the armistice with Germany is of paramount importance and that the men on the front are expendable in the name of peace. Diana is livid at the thought of men who are willing to sit in rooms, hundreds of miles away from the front, and treat the lives of their men so cavalierly. She and Steve can see the clear and present danger that this breakthrough in poison gas technology could mean for the world if is not destroyed. There is a time to fight and a time for peace and knowing which is which takes wisdom. It also takes courage to stand up and lead the fight, even when it’s not the popular course, but the right one regardless.

As the movie comes to the final confrontation between Ares and Diana, Ares tries to make her see the unworthiness of man. Hippolyta told Diana before she left Themyscira that mankind did not deserve her. As Diana ventures into man’s world she finds it an ugly place that is rife with more greys than she expected. Ares continues to press this idea that man does not deserve her protection, yet it’s something that Steve says and does that helps encourage Diana to do the right thing. Steve is well aware that man does not deserve Diana, but he tells her that maybe it not about what they deserve, but what she believes. Mankind is clearly not good, but they can be. Steve willingly gives up his life to save millions. Though all her experiences, Diana can see that mankind has the potential for good and that it’s though her love of Steve that she is able to see that spark in all men. She chooses to love men and defend them, even though they are unworthy and complete undeserving. Diana and Steve live out the greatest love there is, being willing to give up their lives for others. Diana is a hero that fights for love and to bring peace, to help show mankind a better way. Even in the face of the overwhelming evil man is capable of, she bestows grace and love in place of judgement. She’s the better angel of our nature, encouraging us to stand up for what is right, even if it’s not easy or popular.

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The Movie

Gal Gadot is a star. She sells every moment of this film. She has a wonderful, childlike innocence that is needed to bring this character, raised in paradise to life. Diana’s transformation from innocence to a fuller understanding of the real world is powerful and moving. The chemistry she has with Chris Pine is fantastic. They are the heart and soul of this movie and luckily they do not disappoint.

The fight scenes in the movie are incredible. Many superhero movies these days seem to have similar types of set pieces, but Wonder Woman does a marvelous job of making her fighting style feel fresh, leaving you silently fist-pumping in your seat. Even the more CGI-heavy battle at the end has enough emotion built into it, to make you care about what’s happening.

One final note, Patty Jenkins direction is excellent. This woman needs to be given a sequel, as well as more movies to direct. She understands clearly how to make a superhero movie feel serious and fun all at the same time and that’s not always easy to do.

Wonder Women is the first major female superhero to be given her own movie (yes I discount Catwoman and Elektra as they are more side characters) and it’s a triumph. The film is serious in tone, but with laughs aplenty. It’s the movie we all hoped for and deserve. Wonder Woman is rated 4 and half out of 5 stars.

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 – Review

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Marvel is a machine. It’s been pumping out hits (with the occasional miss) since Iron Man in 2008. This summer is no exception as the ever popular Guardians of the Galaxy are back in Vol. 2. The first movie was cotton candy, summer fun, so the question is, can this second film find more depth than the first? Luckily, it does.

Family 

Guardians of the Galaxy was about a group of misfits finding family together and Volume 2 is a continuation of that theme. The concept of the the Guardians as family is challenged in this movie as both Peter and Gamora have to deal with prior or blood relatives. Peter finally comes face to face with his father and as Luke found out in The Empire Strikes Back, knowing who your father is, is not always the best thing. Peter’s story mirrors much of Luke’s as he must choose between ruling the galaxy with his father or saving it as a Guardian. He also finds that he may always have had what he was looking for right in front of him.

Peter’s dad is a Celestial, basically a god, who has lived for millions of years and in that time learned to create worlds. Being alone for so long, he found a way to create a physical form and travel the stars, looking for companionship and love. This is how he met Peter’s mother. Ego, the name of Peter’s dad, decides to turn his back on love and embrace a “higher” calling, to expand the universe, remaking worlds in his image.

guardians-of-the-galaxy-2-kurt-russell-chris-prattEgo has spent millennia trying to create progeny that can assist him in his quest to remake the galaxy and Peter is the first child to share his abilities. He’s no longer alone, but it’s not truly family that he is after, it’s just power. He’s come to see himself as above all other life, since he’s immortal, at least as long as his essence is kept alive at the core of the planet he’s constructed. He has divorced himself from the family of beings in the galaxy, placing himself on a higher plane because of his immortality, which enables him to rationalize exterminating whomever and whatever, since comparatively they are inferior. It’s a reminder that the moment people being to see themselves as better than others, it usually leads to marginalization or at it’s worst, extermination.

Gamora and Nebula finally get something to do in this film! They get the opportunity to deal with what has driven them apart and left them at each others throats for so long. They come to terms with the ways in which Thanos drove a wedge between them, used them and realize that they are actually on the same side. Forgiveness is given and it’s a beautiful scene in the movie. It was great to see them really give these actors a storyline to dig into.

The Movie

This movie is not as slickly put together as the first, it does not seem to flow quite as well as the original, but it has more depth and that makes up for it. It’s nice to have the characters go deeper into themselves. It’s still a little cliche, but it feels stronger and more resonant as a film. Because of these things it’s rated 4 out of 5 Baby Groot dances.

PS

Don’t forget to review and rate The 602 Club on Apple Podcasts for your chance to win some incredible, exclusive Guardians of the Galaxy swag (pictured here)! guardians

The Cave

 

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I was talking to one of my favorite people the other day, Kesseljunkie (He’s my podcast partner on Aggressive Negotiations: A Star Wars Podcast as well as a myriad episodes of The 602 Club). As we so frequently do, we were discussing movies, specifically the DC films and the latest Justice League trailer and it brought something to mind.

There is a scene in The Empire Strikes Back where Luke is being trained by Yoda and he asks about a place that seems cold. Yoda says it is a domain of evil and that Luke must go in. Luke asks, “What’s in there?” to which Yoda responds, “Only what you take with you.”.

This got me thinking about how movies and movie theaters are a lot like that cave on Dagobah. Whenever we step into a theater to see a movie or que one up on Netflix we are not going in blind, we bring with us a plethora of preconceptions, experiences and prejudices into that cave that act as weapons for or against the movie which impact the film. Now, unlike Luke, there are certain “weapons” that are impossible for us to completely get rid of when we enter the cave. We cannot discard our prior experiences, but we can curtail out preconceptions and our prejudices, if we are self aware enough to know what they are. The reason this is important is because what we get out of a movie and whether or not we enjoy it greatly depend upon our own point of view. To put it another way, it greatly depends on what we bring with us into the theater.

The reason this struck a cord for me was the way in which this seems to directly apply to the geek culture that I am apart of. Every franchise has it’s diehard followers that will defend anything that comes out of that franchise no matter what it is. Then there are others that will seemingly hate everything a certain franchise does, just because it’s from that franchise. It’s par for the course in the 21st century where everything is one extreme or another and there seems to be no middle ground for anything. Hyperbole is the language of the day, films, tv shows, politicians and everything else all seem to be either the worst or the best thing ever.

Again referencing the conversation in The Empire Strikes Back, Luke asks “But how am I to know the good side from the bad?” and Yoda replies, “You will know. When you are calm, at peace.” We live not only in a world drowning in hyperbole but it’s accentuated by an eternal hype machine. So I want suggest a different path, like the Bendu in the recent Star Wars Rebels season and chose the way of the middle. We must unlearn what we have learned as we walk into the cave. Approach every movie on it’s own merits. As Yoda says, we should clear out minds of our expectations, preconceptions and presuppositions and allow the film to wash over us, absorbing what it’s trying to say and do first. If we get out of a movie, only what we bring to it, then it seems important for us to not enter with a bad attitude in the first place. The neutrality of the middle allows us to, I think, truly judge a film better.

For me personally, this has worked out thusly. I do my utmost to approach every movie on it’s own. I do my best not to prejudge too much on trailers, since many times trailers can be so misleading. I find it best to go in always hoping the movie will be good and allowing the finished product to speak for itself. It’s hard work disarming the weapons I can bring to bare, like previous films in a series, thoughts on a direct or actor, my own prejudices. I’ve found it to be a much more rewarding experience with movies, tv shows and even books to look at it without those weapons. It’s made it easier for me to see and understand the themes, character motivations and what each work is trying to say, which in turn allows me appreciate it more.

Now, does this mean I like everything? Of course not. But it does even help there, because when I don’t like something, this process allows me to be constructively critical about why and what I feel made something not work. With the self awareness that comes from trying to disarm all the weapons I might bring with me into the cave enables me to be, I think, more fair to the film, show our book and not resort to hyperbole, but break it down in a more constructive and valuable way. In the end, almost every movie, book or tv show is not going to be the best or worst thing ever and finding out the muddle in the middle is most of the fun.

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story – Review

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“It is a period of civil war. Rebel spaceships, striking from a hidden base, have won their first victory against the evil Galactic Empire.

During the battle, Rebel spies managed to steal secret plans to the Empire’s ultimate weapon, the DEATH STAR, an armored space station with enough power to destroy an entire planet.”

These words are the first thing that anyone ever saw of Star Wars as the film opened in 1977 and now Gareth Edwards has imbued them fully in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.

Hope Anew

The Rebellion’s struggle just got worse, as it learns that the Empire has created a world-killing weapon named the Death Star. The Rebellion finds itself on the knife’s edge between hope and despair. The council of the Rebellion cannot decide what to do. Do they risk it all by trying to steal the plans, or do they resign themselves to defeat and despair? Jyn challenges the council, “What chance do we have? The question is what choice”. She implores the council to remember that if they do nothing then they’ve sealed the fate of the galaxy and that evil this great cannot go unopposed. It brings to mind Edmund Burke’s famous saying, “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.” She encourages them with a refrain Cassian Andor said to her earlier in the movie, “Rebellions are built on hope”. Hope changes everything, it reminds people that the way it is, is not how it has to be. Hope is the spark that, if kindled, creates the fire of change. Change is possible, but it takes sacrifice, determination and some times, lives to see it come about. “So now faith, hope, and love abide, these three; but the greatest of these is love.” It takes faith, faith that a difference can be made, which births hope and it’s all because the love of something greater than themselves leads them to live out the truth that, “Greater love has no one than this, that someone lay down his life for his friends.”

The beauty of the film is that hope is not just a figment of the heroes imaginations. The Force seems quite active, even without the Jedi. It’s moving in mysterious ways and bringing people together that can make a difference. This band of rogues does the impossible, one chance at a time, succeeding in their goal and setting in motion something that will see the end of the Empire.

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The Movie

Gareth Edwards made a Star Wars movie that feels completely different and yet utterly familiar, all at the same time. Like The Clone Wars, Edwards uses cinematic inspirations to pull in the war movie genre and make it a Star Wars movie, emphasis on the war. The nods to great war films of the past are all there and they work perfectly. On top of that you feel the “Star Wars” seeping out of every single frame. The Ghost from Star Wars Rebels can be seen at least 4 times, General Sydulla is called for over the coms at Yavin 4, the sets feel like they came out of a lost arc of The Clone Wars, Saw Gerrera has an important role and so much more. The point here is that Edwards lovingly knits together the history of the Prequel and the Original trilogy and it’s seamless.

Star Wars, when it’s at it’s best, is stretching what it means to be Star Wars by taking other genres and telling a story in the Star Wars universe that aligns with the themes of the saga. Edwards achievement is nothing short of incredible, the movie feels like the Maker’s fingerprints are all over it and it’s the highest compliment that could be paid to the movie.

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The characters are outstanding. K-2so is the best new droid since R2 and Jyn, Cassian, Chirrut, Baze and Bhodi are all welcome additions to the Star Wars canon. Darth Vader’s scenes are chilling (and let’s stop here and just geek out completely that Vader’s castle is finally on screen!) and perfectly played, just enough to leave you wanting more.

The music by Giacchino feels like a welcome addition to the Star Wars franchise, it’s much like The Clone Wars music and only references familiar themes in snippets yet that’s a good thing. The movie needed it’s own identity and the themes he created feel familiar and distinct, perfectly matching the spirit of the movie.

I’ll get personal, this movie is everything I wanted a new Star Wars movie to be. Pushing the boundaries of what it means to be Star Wars while at the same time respecting the history and the franchise as a whole. Here’s to hoping the rumors of Edwards wanting to direct a Kenobi movie are true. Rogue One is rated 4.5 upside down Death Stars out of 5.

Side note, if you did not read the book Catalyst by James Luceno, I highly recommend it. It is the lead-in novel for the movie and it does a fantastic job of filling in everything you’d want to know about Krennic, the Ersos and the Death Star.