The Hollars – Review

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Life is so unpredictable and the choices we make are made with so little information, yet they can lead to the most unexpected things. The Hollars, John Krazinski’s new film, is all about life in its messy, glorious joys and sorrows. The story revolves around John Hollar, who is recalled home when his mother is diagnosed with a brain tumor. He is quickly dragged back into his utterly flawed family, a pursuant ex-girlfriend and the need to juggle the pregnant girlfriend he left back in New York. What follows is a poignant reminder of just how important living life to the fullest can be.

The Struggle of Manhood

I really like the way the movie deals with the issue of manhood and how hard it is to live up to society’s expectations as well as our own. John Hollar is in a job he’s not proud of, with a dream of being a graphic novelist, yet he feels inadequate for the task of completing his book. On top of that, he’s left feeling like he’s a failure in the eyes of his girlfriend. She comes from a wealthy family and he knows he can never provide the kind of life she’s accustomed to.

Don Hollar is John’s dad. He’s spent his life running a plumbing business that is now falling apart. The pain for him, as his life’s work crumbles and the love of his life is in the hospital, threatens to crush what’s left of this sensitive soul.

Ron Hollar, John’s brother, is by all accounts the black sheep of the family. Divorced and forced to live in his parents’ basement because he’s out of work, he’s wrestling with the consequences of his life decisions. It was he that wanted the divorce a few years ago, but now he’s realizing the mistake he made and how much he wishes he could go back.

Each one of these men portrays a different aspect of manhood and just how hard it can be to navigate. Feelings of inadequacy drive men to do many things–pull away from those they love, search for greener pastures or just give up. Each Hollar man in the movie has to find the courage to move forward in the choices he’s made. John finds a way to fully commit to his girlfriend Rebecca, Ron must face the consequences of breaking up his family and Don must find the strength to deal with his business and his wife’s illness. In each situation true manhood shines when responsibility is taken for where their decisions have led them but also when they realize that manhood does not require you to walk though life alone.

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A Few Quick Things 

As a quick aside, the marriage of Don and Sally Hollar is just beautiful. Both young when they married, they might have gone on to do other things, yet they honor one another in the commitment they made to each other. And they show true sacrificial love towards the other, being the rock each other needs in the worst of times. They are far from perfect in their marriage, but they are inspirational.

Another quick aside. Ron’s ex-wife Stacey is seeing the new youth pastor at the church. Now, many times the “Christian” character in the film is there to be the butt of jokes, but here, he’s actually everything you’d want him to be. He’s kind to Ron, looking to actually help him. He steps in after Ron has been arrested in the movie and “rescues” him from the police. He does not force his beliefs on Ron, but gives him a sounding board and helping hand. It’s always a pleasant surprise when Christians in movies are portrayed in a positive light.

Conclusion

The Hollars is one of those rare films that comes along, in the midst of towering blockbusters, to remind you of the power of a well-told story. I recommend you go seek this one out and enjoy the simple pleasures of explosion-free cinema.
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2 thoughts on “The Hollars – Review

  1. Pingback: Best Films of 2016 |

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