All Ready, Just Not Yet

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In the movie, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, there is a phrase that is repeated a few times, “Everything will be all right in the end… if it’s not all right then it’s not yet the end.” It is a powerful statement that drives to the heart of human existence. There is a deep longing and desire for a happy ending. Instinctively we wait for things to get better even though empirical evidence does it’s best to quench any hope that better is just around the corner. Tolkien calls it eucatastrophe.

The consolation of fairy-stories, the joy of the happy ending: or more correctly of the good catastrophe, the sudden joyous “turn” (for there is no true end to any fairy-tale): this joy, which is one of the things which fairy-stories can produce supremely well, is not essentially “escapist,” nor “fugitive.” In its fairy-tale—or otherworld—setting, it is a sudden and miraculous grace: never to be counted on to recur. It does not deny the existence of dyscatastrophe, of sorrow and failure: the possibility of these is necessary to the joy of deliverance; it denies (in the face of much evidence, if you will) universal final defeat and in so far is evangelium, giving a fleeting glimpse of Joy, Joy beyond the walls of the world, poignant as grief.

In our minds there is this the idea that there has to be more to life. There must be a joyous “turn” at some point, good has to win, the boy has to get the girl, each of these is an expression of the heart’s desire for all to be set right. Hopelessness ends up leading to the mantra, “Meaningless, meaningless all is meaningless.” Without hope, without a belief that things can and will get better there is only the alternative of suicide; the life of Nietzsche illustrates this well.

The desire that there be more to life is subaqueously rooted in our souls. We look to many things for the answer; money, fame, power, sex, the list is endless. C.S. Lewis says,“If we find ourselves with a desire that nothing in this world can satisfy, the most probable explanation is that we were made for another world.” The Bible’s answer to Lewis’ thoughts on desire and Tolkien’s idea of eucatastrophe are found in the Gospel. John tells us in Revelation, 

Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and the sea was no more. And I saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God,prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, “Behold, the dwelling place of God is with man. He will dwell with them, and they will be his people, and God himself will be with them as their God. He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.”

And he who was seated on the throne said, “Behold, I am making all things new.” Also he said, “Write this down, for these words are trustworthy and true.” And he said to me, “It is done! I am the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end. To the thirsty I will give from the spring of the water of life without payment.

There is coming a day when all will be made new, “For now we see in a mirror dimly, but then face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I have been fully known.” Life is full of valleys and vistas and there will never be a time before the end that is completely “all right”. Yet the promise of the Scripture is this,

And we know that for those who love God all things work together for good, for those who are called according to his purpose. For those whom he foreknew he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son, in order that he might be the firstborn among many brothers. And those whom he predestined he also called, and those whom he called he also justified, and those whom he justified he also glorified.

The process of refinement is at work. The joyous turn is coming and  “Everything will be all right in the end… if it’s not all right then it’s not yet the end” when “the grey rain-curtain turns all to silver glass and rolls back, and we behold white shores and beyond them a far green country under a swift sunrise.”

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