Owl Post 6-4-13

Owl Post 2-17-12

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New KIRKS Judged by Old KHANS:

1ee7718db8d84d8d75576675f3b6649eIt’s practically impossible to keep from comparing this second film in the rebooted Star Trek universe with the second feature film starring the original cast. However, the real seeds of Star Trek Into Darkness aren’t rooted in the soil of the second Star Trek movie, but rather “Space Seed”, the old episode from the original series and ground from which The Wrath of Khan also sprouted. Upon seeing this new film, connections between all three are easily established, but what also gets revealed is both our changing views as a culture and our unchanging nature.

Why I love Superman:

Superman-75-logo__130530225046-275x376With this post we begin our two weeks of daily coverage of Superman, similar to what we’ve recently done with Star Trek and James Bond, counting down to the release of Man of Steel. When I first talked to the bots about doing this, one of them who shall remain nameless (Scarlett Robotica) actually asked, “What would you cover?” What couldn’t we cover? Literally, Supes is one of the few characters who we could write something about his history every day for a year and never run out of material. The only other characters in geekdom who come close to that are Batman and maybe Spider-Man.

The Plastic Fruit of Online Living:

social-media-billboardOnline, Jill is a joyful and encouraging believer. She advocates for the oppressed and raises money for the poor. Every Saturday she tweets about her service at the local homeless shelter. She posts Bible verses several times a day. Based on her social media interactions, her friends seem to love and enjoy her.

Offline, she’s a different Jill.

Before Midnight‘s Rare, Beautiful Message: Love Is Really, Really Hard:

Before Midnight (2013) Ethan Hawk Juli DelpyRichard Linklater’s 1995 film Before Sunrise and its first sequel, 2004’s Before Sunset, tell a pair of simple stories. In the first, a young American named Jesse (Ethan Hawke) strikes up on a conversation on a train with a pretty French girl named Celine (Julie Delpy). There’s a spark, and on the spur of the moment, he makes a suggestion: that she get off the train with him and spend the night walking and talking in Vienna. Intrigued, she takes him up on the rather risky invitation, and over the course of that night, they fall into something resembling love. In the second film, the couple reconnects nine years later, as Jesse (now an unhappily married father) spends the last few hours of his European book tour—he wrote a novel based on their initial encounter—catching up with Celine in Paris. That film ends with the hint that he might make a choice as daring as hers at the beginning of the first: to “miss that plane,” and hit the reset button on his entire existence.

Resolving to Love Calvin and Hobbes (17 Years Later):

Calvin---Hobbes-calvin--26-hobbes-254155_1024_768It’s hard to believe that today (12/31) marks the 17th anniversary of the end of Calvin and Hobbes. While 17 years may sound like a long time, the strip has hardly dated at all. Instead, it is slowly but surely being recognized as the work of art that it is/was, and not just by us. The amount of expression and joy and humanity that Bill Watterson was able to wring out of those four panels over ten short years (1985-1995) is simply astounding. Mark my words: Calvin and Hobbes will go down as one of the abiding cultural achievements of our time.

What Not to Say to a Friend Who’s Getting Divorced:

Divorce is like cancer. Not because you’re sick, but because no one knows quite what to do with you when they see you.

Are you supposed to act like nothing’s happened when you see a friend who recently got a divorce? Do you throw your arms around them in the grocery store and tell them how sorry you are? Do you leave self-help books on their doorstep? Offer to counsel them through a Facebook message?

I Boldly Went Where Every Star Trek Movie and TV Show Has Gone Before:

Star_Trek_Group_Shot_freecomputerdesktopwallpaper_2048Now I can tell you exactly why this franchise is great.

In the second episode of the seventh season of the fourth Star Trek television series, Icheb, an alien teenage civilian who’s been living aboard a Federation vessel for several months after having been rescued from both the Borg and abusive parents, issues a plaintive cry: “Isn’t that what people on this ship do? They help each other?”

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2 thoughts on “Owl Post 6-4-13

  1. acps927

    I really enjoyed both Star Trek articles, and I am with the writer the Slate article hoping Star Trek can make a great return to TV sooner rather than later, because that is where it really belongs. By the way, just listened to The Ready Room’s take on Into Darkness yesterday and agreed the most with you. I thought most everything about it was solid; not perfect, but definitely a step in the right direction.

    Reply
    1. mrushing02 Post author

      Thank you so much, I really appreciate that. I am hoping that Trek will make it’s way back to TV soon as well. I would love to see it as an animated show. There is so much potential to do a Clone Wars style, one hour show.

      Reply

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